A 10-year review of pediatric uveitis at a hispanic-dominated tertiary pediatric ophthalmic clinic

Kruti P. Dajee, Jennifer Landau Rossen, Monica L. Bratton, Jess T. Whitson, Yu Guang He

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the characteristics and outcomes of pediatric uveitis cases at a large tertiary referral center in Dallas, TX, USA. Materials and methods: The authors performed a retrospective chart review between 2001 and 2011 to identify children with uveitis. Results: A total of 46 children (68 eyes) with uveitis were identified. Sixty-seven percent were Hispanic, and the mean age was 9.2 years. The majority of cases were idiopathic (74%). Anterior uveitis accounted for 42% of cases followed by intermediate uveitis/pars planitis (33%), posterior uveitis/retinitis (7%), and panuveitis (20%). Most patients were treated with corticosteroids (98% topical), 52% with systemic immunosuppression therapy, and 30% with surgery. Complications occurred in 74% of patients, with the most common complication being cataract development (26%), followed by posterior synechiae (24%). Twenty-four percent of patients had recurrences. Hispanic patients had worse visual acuities at presentation (P-value =0.073) and follow-up (P-value =0.057), compared to non-Hispanic patients. Conclusion: Pediatric uveitis cases seen in a large center in Dallas were largely idiopathic, had commonly developed complications, and were associated with worse visual outcomes in Hispanic patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1607-1612
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Ophthalmology
Volume10
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 22 2016

Fingerprint

Uveitis
Hispanic Americans
Pediatrics
Pars Planitis
Intermediate Uveitis
Panuveitis
Posterior Uveitis
Anterior Uveitis
Retinitis
Tertiary Care Centers
Immunosuppression
Cataract
Visual Acuity
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Recurrence

Keywords

  • Dallas
  • Hispanic
  • Outcomes
  • Pediatric ophthalmology
  • Uveitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

A 10-year review of pediatric uveitis at a hispanic-dominated tertiary pediatric ophthalmic clinic. / Dajee, Kruti P.; Rossen, Jennifer Landau; Bratton, Monica L.; Whitson, Jess T.; He, Yu Guang.

In: Clinical Ophthalmology, Vol. 10, 22.08.2016, p. 1607-1612.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dajee, Kruti P. ; Rossen, Jennifer Landau ; Bratton, Monica L. ; Whitson, Jess T. ; He, Yu Guang. / A 10-year review of pediatric uveitis at a hispanic-dominated tertiary pediatric ophthalmic clinic. In: Clinical Ophthalmology. 2016 ; Vol. 10. pp. 1607-1612.
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