A cancer-associated galactosyltransferase isoenzyme

D. K. Podolsky, M. M. Weiser, K. J. Isselbacher, A. M. Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In previous publications the authors reported the detection of an electrophoretically distinct form of serum galactosyltransferase (GT-II), predominantly in patients with neoplastic disease. This report extends these observations to a larger series of patients and confirms the association of serum GT-II activity with carcinoma. In the present study 73 to 83 per cent of patients with various tumors of the gastrointestinal tract had detectable serum GT-II activity. The present data also show a correlation of serum GT-II levels with extent of cancer. The finding of GT-II activity in patients with colorectal tumors was independent of the colonic site of the neoplasm. Analysis of the levels of serum GT-II activity before operation and their correlation with the staging of colorectal carcinoma (Dukes' classification) revealed two points: the preoperative level of GT-II activity appeared to correlate with the overall extent of tumor and, in the majority of patients with Dukes' B lesions (or tumor of limited extent and amenable to surgical resection), GT-II could be demonstrated in the serum. False-positive results have been found in only two types of nonmalignant disorders - namely, severe alcoholic hepatitis (three of 15 patients) and severe celiac disease (18 of 20 patients).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)703-705
Number of pages3
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume299
Issue number13
StatePublished - 1978

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Galactosyltransferases
Isoenzymes
Serum
Neoplasms
Colorectal Neoplasms
Alcoholic Hepatitis
Celiac Disease
Colonic Neoplasms
Gastrointestinal Tract
Carcinoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Podolsky, D. K., Weiser, M. M., Isselbacher, K. J., & Cohen, A. M. (1978). A cancer-associated galactosyltransferase isoenzyme. New England Journal of Medicine, 299(13), 703-705.

A cancer-associated galactosyltransferase isoenzyme. / Podolsky, D. K.; Weiser, M. M.; Isselbacher, K. J.; Cohen, A. M.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 299, No. 13, 1978, p. 703-705.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Podolsky, DK, Weiser, MM, Isselbacher, KJ & Cohen, AM 1978, 'A cancer-associated galactosyltransferase isoenzyme', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 299, no. 13, pp. 703-705.
Podolsky DK, Weiser MM, Isselbacher KJ, Cohen AM. A cancer-associated galactosyltransferase isoenzyme. New England Journal of Medicine. 1978;299(13):703-705.
Podolsky, D. K. ; Weiser, M. M. ; Isselbacher, K. J. ; Cohen, A. M. / A cancer-associated galactosyltransferase isoenzyme. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1978 ; Vol. 299, No. 13. pp. 703-705.
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