A case of masquerading alloantibodies

the value of a multitechnique approach

Paula Wennersten, Laurie J. Sutor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In an immunohematology reference laboratory, samples received for antibody identification react in many different ways requiring a variety of approaches. Sometimes, the clues from initial testing can lead to faulty assumptions and misdirection. Fortunately, a well-supplied reference laboratory will have access to a variety of techniques and reagents that, when used together, can reveal the true identity of the antibodies involved. We present a case of a patient sample with an apparent group AB, D+ blood type showing strong reactivity with all cells tested in the forward and reverse ABO, in the D testing as well as in a three-cell antibody screen. The initial assumption was that the plasma contained a cold autoantibody. Subsequent testing, including the use of gel column technology, ficin-treated cells, and antisera for phenotyping, showed the apparent cold autoantibody to bea red herring. Additional tube testing at immediate spin, 37°C,and indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) revealed the presence of four alloantibodies: anti-M and anti-E reacting at immediate spin, 37°C, and IAT plus anti-Fy(a) and anti-Jk(b) reacting at lAT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-120
Number of pages4
JournalImmunohematology
Volume30
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2014

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Isoantibodies
Coombs Test
Autoantibodies
Antibodies
Ficain
Immune Sera
Gels
Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A case of masquerading alloantibodies : the value of a multitechnique approach. / Wennersten, Paula; Sutor, Laurie J.

In: Immunohematology, Vol. 30, No. 3, 2014, p. 117-120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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