A comparative study of standard intensity-modulated radiotherapy and RapidArc planning techniques for ipsilateral and bilateral head and neck irradiation

Jennifer Pursley, Antonio L. Damato, Maria A. Czerminska, Danielle N. Margalit, David J. Sher, Roy B. Tishler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate class solutions using RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning for ipsilateral and bilateral head and neck (H&N) irradiation, and to compare dosimetric results with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans. A total of 14 patients who received ipsilateral and 10 patients who received bilateral head and neck irradiation were retrospectively replanned with several volumetric-modulated arc therapy techniques. For ipsilateral neck irradiation, the volumetric-modulated arc therapy techniques included two 360° arcs, two 360° arcs with avoidance sectors around the contralateral parotid, two 260° or 270° arcs, and two 210° arcs. For bilateral neck irradiation, the volumetric-modulated arc therapy techniques included two 360° arcs, two 360° arcs with avoidance sectors around the shoulders, and 3 arcs. All patients had a sliding-window-delivery intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan that was used as the benchmark for dosimetric comparison. For ipsilateral neck irradiation, a volumetric-modulated arc therapy technique using two 360° arcs with avoidance sectors around the contralateral parotid was dosimetrically comparable to intensity-modulated radiotherapy, with improved conformity (conformity index = 1.22 vs 1.36, p < 0.04) and lower contralateral parotid mean dose (5.6 vs 6.8 Gy, p < 0.03). For bilateral neck irradiation, 3-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy techniques were dosimetrically comparable to intensity-modulated radiotherapy while also avoiding irradiation through the shoulders. All volumetric-modulated arc therapy techniques required fewer monitor units than sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy to deliver treatment, with an average reduction of 35% for ipsilateral plans and 67% for bilateral plans. Thus, for ipsilateral head and neck irradiation a volumetric-modulated arc therapy technique using two 360° arcs with avoidance sectors around the contralateral parotid is recommended. For bilateral neck irradiation, 2- or 3-arc techniques are dosimetrically comparable to intensity-modulated radiotherapy, but more work is needed to determine the optimal approaches by disease site.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-36
Number of pages6
JournalMedical Dosimetry
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

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Planning Techniques
Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy
Neck
Head
Benchmarking

Keywords

  • Dosimetry
  • Head and neck cancer
  • IMRT
  • RapidArc
  • VMAT

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

A comparative study of standard intensity-modulated radiotherapy and RapidArc planning techniques for ipsilateral and bilateral head and neck irradiation. / Pursley, Jennifer; Damato, Antonio L.; Czerminska, Maria A.; Margalit, Danielle N.; Sher, David J.; Tishler, Roy B.

In: Medical Dosimetry, Vol. 42, No. 1, 01.02.2017, p. 31-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pursley, Jennifer ; Damato, Antonio L. ; Czerminska, Maria A. ; Margalit, Danielle N. ; Sher, David J. ; Tishler, Roy B. / A comparative study of standard intensity-modulated radiotherapy and RapidArc planning techniques for ipsilateral and bilateral head and neck irradiation. In: Medical Dosimetry. 2017 ; Vol. 42, No. 1. pp. 31-36.
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