A comparison of an interactive computer-based method with a conventional reading approach for learning pelvic anatomy

Marlene M. Corton, Don D. McIntire, Clifford Y. Wai, Frank W. Ling, George D. Wendel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study was undertaken to assess the impact of interactive, computer-based versus conventional, paper-based format in student, resident, and fellow learning and retention of anatomy knowledge. Study design: Randomized longitudinal cohort design with scores repeated as pre-, post-, and follow-up tests. Subjects were randomly assigned to an anatomy module in computer-based (CD-ROM) format and 1 in paper-based format. A follow-up examination was administered 3 weeks after the posttest to evaluate retention of knowledge. Tests results were analyzed by using Student t tests and analysis of variance. Results: Thirty-nine subjects completed all testing. Regardless of instructional method, pretest to posttest scores improved (P < .01), and posttest to follow-up test scores decreased among all levels of training (P < .01). Student satisfaction was highest with CD-ROM format. Conclusion: Improvement and retention of anatomy knowledge was not significantly different when comparing a new CD-ROM interactive approach with a traditional paper-based method.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1438-1443
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume195
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2006

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CD-ROM
Reading
Anatomy
Students
Analysis of Variance
Learning

Keywords

  • Computer-based education
  • Interactive teaching
  • Pelvic anatomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

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title = "A comparison of an interactive computer-based method with a conventional reading approach for learning pelvic anatomy",
abstract = "Objective: This study was undertaken to assess the impact of interactive, computer-based versus conventional, paper-based format in student, resident, and fellow learning and retention of anatomy knowledge. Study design: Randomized longitudinal cohort design with scores repeated as pre-, post-, and follow-up tests. Subjects were randomly assigned to an anatomy module in computer-based (CD-ROM) format and 1 in paper-based format. A follow-up examination was administered 3 weeks after the posttest to evaluate retention of knowledge. Tests results were analyzed by using Student t tests and analysis of variance. Results: Thirty-nine subjects completed all testing. Regardless of instructional method, pretest to posttest scores improved (P < .01), and posttest to follow-up test scores decreased among all levels of training (P < .01). Student satisfaction was highest with CD-ROM format. Conclusion: Improvement and retention of anatomy knowledge was not significantly different when comparing a new CD-ROM interactive approach with a traditional paper-based method.",
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author = "Corton, {Marlene M.} and McIntire, {Don D.} and Wai, {Clifford Y.} and Ling, {Frank W.} and Wendel, {George D.}",
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AU - Corton, Marlene M.

AU - McIntire, Don D.

AU - Wai, Clifford Y.

AU - Ling, Frank W.

AU - Wendel, George D.

PY - 2006/11

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N2 - Objective: This study was undertaken to assess the impact of interactive, computer-based versus conventional, paper-based format in student, resident, and fellow learning and retention of anatomy knowledge. Study design: Randomized longitudinal cohort design with scores repeated as pre-, post-, and follow-up tests. Subjects were randomly assigned to an anatomy module in computer-based (CD-ROM) format and 1 in paper-based format. A follow-up examination was administered 3 weeks after the posttest to evaluate retention of knowledge. Tests results were analyzed by using Student t tests and analysis of variance. Results: Thirty-nine subjects completed all testing. Regardless of instructional method, pretest to posttest scores improved (P < .01), and posttest to follow-up test scores decreased among all levels of training (P < .01). Student satisfaction was highest with CD-ROM format. Conclusion: Improvement and retention of anatomy knowledge was not significantly different when comparing a new CD-ROM interactive approach with a traditional paper-based method.

AB - Objective: This study was undertaken to assess the impact of interactive, computer-based versus conventional, paper-based format in student, resident, and fellow learning and retention of anatomy knowledge. Study design: Randomized longitudinal cohort design with scores repeated as pre-, post-, and follow-up tests. Subjects were randomly assigned to an anatomy module in computer-based (CD-ROM) format and 1 in paper-based format. A follow-up examination was administered 3 weeks after the posttest to evaluate retention of knowledge. Tests results were analyzed by using Student t tests and analysis of variance. Results: Thirty-nine subjects completed all testing. Regardless of instructional method, pretest to posttest scores improved (P < .01), and posttest to follow-up test scores decreased among all levels of training (P < .01). Student satisfaction was highest with CD-ROM format. Conclusion: Improvement and retention of anatomy knowledge was not significantly different when comparing a new CD-ROM interactive approach with a traditional paper-based method.

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