A comparison of delusional disorders in women and men

M. Rudden, J. Sweeney, A. Frances, M. Gilmore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors compared delusional disorders in men and women and found that women have more frequent erotic and heterosexual delusions, more affective symptoms, and more interpersonal precipitants and that men have more delusions with a homosexual theme. Perhaps because of these differences in delusional content and affective symptoms, delusional women are more difficult to diagnose within the DSM-III nomenclature than are delusional men. The authors discuss these findings from psychodynamic, etiologic, and sociocultural perspectives and suggest ways of improving DSM-III to make it more representative of female patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1575-1578
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume140
Issue number12
StatePublished - 1983

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Paranoid Schizophrenia
Affective Symptoms
Delusions
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Patient Advocacy
Heterosexuality
Terminology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Rudden, M., Sweeney, J., Frances, A., & Gilmore, M. (1983). A comparison of delusional disorders in women and men. American Journal of Psychiatry, 140(12), 1575-1578.

A comparison of delusional disorders in women and men. / Rudden, M.; Sweeney, J.; Frances, A.; Gilmore, M.

In: American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 140, No. 12, 1983, p. 1575-1578.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rudden, M, Sweeney, J, Frances, A & Gilmore, M 1983, 'A comparison of delusional disorders in women and men', American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 140, no. 12, pp. 1575-1578.
Rudden M, Sweeney J, Frances A, Gilmore M. A comparison of delusional disorders in women and men. American Journal of Psychiatry. 1983;140(12):1575-1578.
Rudden, M. ; Sweeney, J. ; Frances, A. ; Gilmore, M. / A comparison of delusional disorders in women and men. In: American Journal of Psychiatry. 1983 ; Vol. 140, No. 12. pp. 1575-1578.
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