A comparison of lorazepam, diazepam, and placebo for the treatment of out-of-hospital status epilepticus

Brian K. Alldredge, Alan M. Gelb, S. Marshal Isaacs, Megan D. Corry, Faith Allen, Suekay Ulrich, Mildred D. Gottwald, Nelda O'Neil, John M. Neuhaus, Mark R. Segal, Daniel H. Lowenstein

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595 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: It is uncertain whether the administration of benzodiazepines by paramedics is an effective and safe treatment for out-of-hospital status epilepticus. Methods: We conducted a randomized, double-blind trial to evaluate intravenous benzodiazepines administered by paramedics for the treatment of out-of-hospital status epilepticus. Adults with prolonged (lasting five minutes or more) or repetitive generalized convulsive seizures received intravenous diazepam (5 mg), lorazepam (2 mg), or placebo. An identical second injection was given if needed. Results: Of the 205 patients enrolled, 66 received lorazepam, 68 received diazepam, and 71 received placebo. Status epilepticus had been terminated on arrival at the emergency department in more patients treated with lorazepam (59.1 percent) or diazepam (42.6 percent) than patients given placebo (21.1 percent) (P=0.001). After adjustment for covariates, the odds ratio for termination of status epilepticus by the time of arrival in the lorazepam group as compared with the placebo group was 4.8 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.9 to 13.0). The odds ratio was 1.9 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.8 to 4.4) in the lorazepam group as compared with the diazepam group and 2.3 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.0 to 5.9) in the diazepam group as compared with the placebo group. The rates of respiratory or circulatory complications after the study treatment was administered were 10.6 percent for the lorazepam group, 10.3 percent for the diazepam group, and 22.5 percent for the placebo group (P=0.08). Conclusions: Benzodiazepines are safe and effective when administered by paramedics for out-of-hospital status epilepticus in adults. Lorazepam is likely to be a better therapy than diazepam.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)631-637
Number of pages7
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume345
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 30 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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    Alldredge, B. K., Gelb, A. M., Marshal Isaacs, S., Corry, M. D., Allen, F., Ulrich, S., Gottwald, M. D., O'Neil, N., Neuhaus, J. M., Segal, M. R., & Lowenstein, D. H. (2001). A comparison of lorazepam, diazepam, and placebo for the treatment of out-of-hospital status epilepticus. New England Journal of Medicine, 345(9), 631-637. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa002141