A comprehensive survey of medical licensing laws and guidelines regulating the interstate practice of pathology

Matthew C. Hiemenz, Stanley T. Leung, Jason Y. Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the United States, recent judicial interpretation of interstate licensure laws has found pathologists guilty of malpractice and, more importantly, the criminal practice of medicine without a license. These judgments against pathologists highlight the need for a timely and comprehensive survey of licensure requirements and laws regulating the interstate practice of pathology. For all 50 states, each state medical practice act and state medical board website was reviewed. In addition, each medical board was directly contacted by electronic mail, telephone, or US registered mail for information regarding specific legislation or guidelines related to the interstate practice of pathology. On the basis of this information, states were grouped according to similarities in legislation and medical board regulations. This comprehensive survey has determined that states define the practice of pathology on the basis of the geographic location of the patient at the time of surgery or phlebotomy. The majority of states (n=32) and the District of Columbia allow for a physician with an out-of-state license to perform limited consultation to a physician with the specific state license. Several states (n=5) prohibit physicians from consultation without a license for the specific state. Overall, these results reveal the heterogeneity of licensure requirements between states. Pathologists who either practice in multiple states, send cases to out-of-state consultants, or serve as consultants themselves should familiarize themselves with the medical licensure laws of the states from which they receive or send cases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgical Pathology
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

Fingerprint

Licensure
Guidelines
Pathology
Consultants
Physicians
Medical Licensure
Medical Legislation
Referral and Consultation
Geographic Locations
Phlebotomy
Malpractice
Postal Service
Surveys and Questionnaires
Legislation
Telephone
Medicine
Pathologists

Keywords

  • interstate licensure
  • interstate practice of medicine
  • pathology licensure
  • practice of medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

A comprehensive survey of medical licensing laws and guidelines regulating the interstate practice of pathology. / Hiemenz, Matthew C.; Leung, Stanley T.; Park, Jason Y.

In: American Journal of Surgical Pathology, Vol. 38, No. 3, 03.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{15d5b41091fb4645b41fef7bf3715a0f,
title = "A comprehensive survey of medical licensing laws and guidelines regulating the interstate practice of pathology",
abstract = "In the United States, recent judicial interpretation of interstate licensure laws has found pathologists guilty of malpractice and, more importantly, the criminal practice of medicine without a license. These judgments against pathologists highlight the need for a timely and comprehensive survey of licensure requirements and laws regulating the interstate practice of pathology. For all 50 states, each state medical practice act and state medical board website was reviewed. In addition, each medical board was directly contacted by electronic mail, telephone, or US registered mail for information regarding specific legislation or guidelines related to the interstate practice of pathology. On the basis of this information, states were grouped according to similarities in legislation and medical board regulations. This comprehensive survey has determined that states define the practice of pathology on the basis of the geographic location of the patient at the time of surgery or phlebotomy. The majority of states (n=32) and the District of Columbia allow for a physician with an out-of-state license to perform limited consultation to a physician with the specific state license. Several states (n=5) prohibit physicians from consultation without a license for the specific state. Overall, these results reveal the heterogeneity of licensure requirements between states. Pathologists who either practice in multiple states, send cases to out-of-state consultants, or serve as consultants themselves should familiarize themselves with the medical licensure laws of the states from which they receive or send cases.",
keywords = "interstate licensure, interstate practice of medicine, pathology licensure, practice of medicine",
author = "Hiemenz, {Matthew C.} and Leung, {Stanley T.} and Park, {Jason Y.}",
year = "2014",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1097/PAS.0000000000000168",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "38",
journal = "American Journal of Surgical Pathology",
issn = "0147-5185",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A comprehensive survey of medical licensing laws and guidelines regulating the interstate practice of pathology

AU - Hiemenz, Matthew C.

AU - Leung, Stanley T.

AU - Park, Jason Y.

PY - 2014/3

Y1 - 2014/3

N2 - In the United States, recent judicial interpretation of interstate licensure laws has found pathologists guilty of malpractice and, more importantly, the criminal practice of medicine without a license. These judgments against pathologists highlight the need for a timely and comprehensive survey of licensure requirements and laws regulating the interstate practice of pathology. For all 50 states, each state medical practice act and state medical board website was reviewed. In addition, each medical board was directly contacted by electronic mail, telephone, or US registered mail for information regarding specific legislation or guidelines related to the interstate practice of pathology. On the basis of this information, states were grouped according to similarities in legislation and medical board regulations. This comprehensive survey has determined that states define the practice of pathology on the basis of the geographic location of the patient at the time of surgery or phlebotomy. The majority of states (n=32) and the District of Columbia allow for a physician with an out-of-state license to perform limited consultation to a physician with the specific state license. Several states (n=5) prohibit physicians from consultation without a license for the specific state. Overall, these results reveal the heterogeneity of licensure requirements between states. Pathologists who either practice in multiple states, send cases to out-of-state consultants, or serve as consultants themselves should familiarize themselves with the medical licensure laws of the states from which they receive or send cases.

AB - In the United States, recent judicial interpretation of interstate licensure laws has found pathologists guilty of malpractice and, more importantly, the criminal practice of medicine without a license. These judgments against pathologists highlight the need for a timely and comprehensive survey of licensure requirements and laws regulating the interstate practice of pathology. For all 50 states, each state medical practice act and state medical board website was reviewed. In addition, each medical board was directly contacted by electronic mail, telephone, or US registered mail for information regarding specific legislation or guidelines related to the interstate practice of pathology. On the basis of this information, states were grouped according to similarities in legislation and medical board regulations. This comprehensive survey has determined that states define the practice of pathology on the basis of the geographic location of the patient at the time of surgery or phlebotomy. The majority of states (n=32) and the District of Columbia allow for a physician with an out-of-state license to perform limited consultation to a physician with the specific state license. Several states (n=5) prohibit physicians from consultation without a license for the specific state. Overall, these results reveal the heterogeneity of licensure requirements between states. Pathologists who either practice in multiple states, send cases to out-of-state consultants, or serve as consultants themselves should familiarize themselves with the medical licensure laws of the states from which they receive or send cases.

KW - interstate licensure

KW - interstate practice of medicine

KW - pathology licensure

KW - practice of medicine

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84894499106&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84894499106&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/PAS.0000000000000168

DO - 10.1097/PAS.0000000000000168

M3 - Article

C2 - 24525516

AN - SCOPUS:84894499106

VL - 38

JO - American Journal of Surgical Pathology

JF - American Journal of Surgical Pathology

SN - 0147-5185

IS - 3

ER -