A diagnostic cycle test for McArdle's disease

John Vissing, Ronald G. Haller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated whether the second wind phenomenon (ie, a decrease in heart rate and perceived exertion during exercise) is pathognomonic for McArdle's disease. Twenty-four patients with McArdle's disease, 17 healthy subjects, and 25 patients with other inborn errors of muscle metabolism cycled a constant workload for 15 minutes. In McArdle's disease patients, heart rate consistently decreased by 35 ± 3 beats per minute from the 7 th to the 15th minute of exercise, whereas heart rate increased progressively with exercise in all 42 control subjects. The findings indicate that cycling at a moderate, constant workload provides a specific, sensitive, and simple diagnostic test for McArdle's disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)539-542
Number of pages4
JournalAnnals of Neurology
Volume54
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2003

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Glycogen Storage Disease Type V
Routine Diagnostic Tests
Heart Rate
Exercise
Workload
Inborn Errors Metabolism
Healthy Volunteers
Muscles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

A diagnostic cycle test for McArdle's disease. / Vissing, John; Haller, Ronald G.

In: Annals of Neurology, Vol. 54, No. 4, 01.10.2003, p. 539-542.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vissing, John ; Haller, Ronald G. / A diagnostic cycle test for McArdle's disease. In: Annals of Neurology. 2003 ; Vol. 54, No. 4. pp. 539-542.
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