A dilated fetal stomach predicts a complicated postnatal course in cases of prenatally diagnosed gastroschisis

Abimbola J. Aina-Mumuney, Anne C. Fischer, Karin J. Blakemore, Jude P. Crino, Kathleen Costigan, Kerry Swenson, Christian A. Chisholm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether dilation of the fetal stomach is associated with increased perinatal complications in infants with prenatally diagnosed gastroschisis. Study design: From 34 newborn infants with gastroschisis who were delivered at our institution over a 10-year period, 2 groups were analyzed on the basis of the presence or absence of a dilated fetal stomach. Reactive versus nonreactive nonstress test results were recorded, when performed. Neonatal outcomes were compared. Results: Twenty-one fetuses had no evidence of gastric dilation. Thirteen fetuses had a dilated fetal stomach that was identified by ultrasound scanning. Within this group there was a higher incidence of nonreactive nonstress tests (P = .01). Infants with a prenatally dilated stomach had a higher incidence of volvulus and neonatal death, a significantly delayed time to full oral feeds, and a longer hospitalization than those infants who did not have a prenatally dilated stomach (P ≤ .05). Conclusion: Postnatal morbidity and mortality rates are increased in infants with gastroschisis who have a prenatally dilated stomach. These fetuses, although not acidotic at delivery, also had a higher incidence of nonreactive nonstress test results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1326-1330
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume190
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2004

Fingerprint

Gastroschisis
Stomach
Gastric Dilatation
Fetus
Incidence
Intestinal Volvulus
Hospitalization
Newborn Infant
Morbidity
Mortality

Keywords

  • Dilated fetal stomach
  • Gastroschisis
  • Nonstress test
  • Postnatal morbidity
  • Volvulus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Aina-Mumuney, A. J., Fischer, A. C., Blakemore, K. J., Crino, J. P., Costigan, K., Swenson, K., & Chisholm, C. A. (2004). A dilated fetal stomach predicts a complicated postnatal course in cases of prenatally diagnosed gastroschisis. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 190(5), 1326-1330. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2003.11.003

A dilated fetal stomach predicts a complicated postnatal course in cases of prenatally diagnosed gastroschisis. / Aina-Mumuney, Abimbola J.; Fischer, Anne C.; Blakemore, Karin J.; Crino, Jude P.; Costigan, Kathleen; Swenson, Kerry; Chisholm, Christian A.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 190, No. 5, 05.2004, p. 1326-1330.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Aina-Mumuney, AJ, Fischer, AC, Blakemore, KJ, Crino, JP, Costigan, K, Swenson, K & Chisholm, CA 2004, 'A dilated fetal stomach predicts a complicated postnatal course in cases of prenatally diagnosed gastroschisis', American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 190, no. 5, pp. 1326-1330. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2003.11.003
Aina-Mumuney, Abimbola J. ; Fischer, Anne C. ; Blakemore, Karin J. ; Crino, Jude P. ; Costigan, Kathleen ; Swenson, Kerry ; Chisholm, Christian A. / A dilated fetal stomach predicts a complicated postnatal course in cases of prenatally diagnosed gastroschisis. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2004 ; Vol. 190, No. 5. pp. 1326-1330.
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