A double-blind comparison of olanzapine versus risperidone in the acute treatment of dementia-related behavioral disturbances in extended care facilities

Catherine S. Fontaine, Linda S. Hynan, Kathleen Koch, Kristin Martin-Cook, Doris Svetlik, Myron F. Weiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: In addition to demonstrating their superiority to placebo, there is a need to compare the relative efficacy and side effects of atypical neuroleptics for the acute treatment of dementia-related behavioral disturbances in residents of long-term care facilities. Method: In a double-blind parallel study allowing dose titration over 14 days, 39 agitated persons with DSM-IV dementia who were residing in long-term care facilities were administered olanzapine (N = 20) or risperidone (N = 19) as acute treatment. Drug was administered once a day at bedtime. The initial dosages were olanzapine, 2.5 mg/day, and risperidone, 0.5 mg/day. Titration was allowed to maximum doses of olanzapine, 10 mg/day, and risperidone, 2.0 mg/day. The primary outcome measures were the Clinical Global Impressions scale (CGI) and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Data were gathered from 2000 to 2002. Results: Both drugs produced significant reductions in CGI and NPI scores (p < .0001), but there was no significant difference between drugs. The mean olanzapine dose was 6.65 mg/day; for risperidone, the dose was 1.47 mg/day. The positive drug effect was not accompanied by decreased mobility, and there was improvement on a quality-of-life measure. The chief adverse events were drowsiness and falls. At baseline, 42% (16/38) of subjects in both groups had extrapyramidal symptoms that increased slightly, but not significantly, by the end of the study. Conclusion: Low-dose, once-a-day olanzapine and risperidone appear to be equally safe and equally effective in the treatment of dementia-related behavioral disturbances in residents of extended care facilities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)726-730
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychiatry
Volume64
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1 2003

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olanzapine
Skilled Nursing Facilities
Risperidone
Dementia
Long-Term Care
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Therapeutics
Equipment and Supplies
Sleep Stages
Double-Blind Method
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Antipsychotic Agents
Placebos
Quality of Life
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

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A double-blind comparison of olanzapine versus risperidone in the acute treatment of dementia-related behavioral disturbances in extended care facilities. / Fontaine, Catherine S.; Hynan, Linda S.; Koch, Kathleen; Martin-Cook, Kristin; Svetlik, Doris; Weiner, Myron F.

In: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, Vol. 64, No. 6, 01.06.2003, p. 726-730.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fontaine, Catherine S. ; Hynan, Linda S. ; Koch, Kathleen ; Martin-Cook, Kristin ; Svetlik, Doris ; Weiner, Myron F. / A double-blind comparison of olanzapine versus risperidone in the acute treatment of dementia-related behavioral disturbances in extended care facilities. In: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. 2003 ; Vol. 64, No. 6. pp. 726-730.
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