A follow-up study of a large group of children struck by lightning

Lynette Mary Ann Silva, Mary Ann Cooper, Ryan Blumenthal, Neil Pliskin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. On 11 November 1994, 26 preadolescent girls, 2 adult supervisors and 7 dogs were sleeping in a tent in rural South Africa when the tent was struck by lightning. Four of the girls and 4 of the dogs were killed. The 2 adults were unharmed, but all but 3 of the children suffered significant injuries. An article in 2002 detailed the event and examined the medical and psychological changes in the surviving girls. Objective. To understand the medical and psychological changes secondary to lightning strike years after injury. Methods. An online questionnaire was prepared that included a checklist of physical and psychological symptoms. Participants were asked to report on both initial and current symptoms. Eleven of the 22 survivors were contacted, and 10 completed the survey. Results. Participants reported that initial physical symptoms generally resolved over time, with ~10 - 20% continuing to experience physical symptoms. Vision problems persisted in 50% of respondents. Psychological symptoms, overall, had a later onset and were more likely to be chronic or currently experienced. Depression and anxiety, specifically, were higher among the survivors than the reported incidence in South Africa. Conclusions. Initial and current/chronic physical and psychological symptoms following lightning strike are reported, adding to the body of literature on the long-term after-effects of lightning strike on survivors. A brief discussion on post-traumatic stress disorder symptomatology and post-lightning shock syndrome is provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)929-932
Number of pages4
JournalSouth African Medical Journal
Volume106
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Lightning
Psychology
Survivors
South Africa
Dogs
Wounds and Injuries
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Checklist
Shock
Anxiety
Depression
Incidence
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Burns
  • Cataract
  • Chronic pain
  • Chronic pain
  • Clinical symptom
  • Eye injury
  • Follow-up study
  • Lightning burns
  • Lightning injury
  • Macula
  • Post lightning shock syndrome
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Psychological injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A follow-up study of a large group of children struck by lightning. / Silva, Lynette Mary Ann; Cooper, Mary Ann; Blumenthal, Ryan; Pliskin, Neil.

In: South African Medical Journal, Vol. 106, No. 9, 2016, p. 929-932.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Silva, Lynette Mary Ann ; Cooper, Mary Ann ; Blumenthal, Ryan ; Pliskin, Neil. / A follow-up study of a large group of children struck by lightning. In: South African Medical Journal. 2016 ; Vol. 106, No. 9. pp. 929-932.
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