A long-term follow-up case study of crossed aphasia assessed by single-photon emission tomography (SPECT), language, and neuropsychological testing

Delaina Walker-Batson, John S. Wendt, Michael D. Devous, Mary M. Barton, Frederick J. Bonte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

A 65-year-old man with well-defined crossed aphasia secondary to right cerebral infarction 10 years previously was studied for current language and cognitive abilities and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during cognitive activation measured by single-photon emission tomography (SPECT). Reversed hemispheric lateralization was demonstrated by qualitative aspects of the patient's constructional deficits, dominant parietal lobe signs, and absence of the neglect syndrome. Language activation procedures during SPECT produced focal increases in rCBF to both frontal lobes with a phoneme detection task and to right temporal and parietal lobes with a math task. The authors stress the complexities of assessing brain/language mechanisms in vivo and demonstrate variabilities in rCBF during language activation dependent on task selection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)311-322
Number of pages12
JournalBrain and language
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Speech and Hearing

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A long-term follow-up case study of crossed aphasia assessed by single-photon emission tomography (SPECT), language, and neuropsychological testing'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this