A longitudinal analysis of psychiatric severity upon outcomes among substance abusers residing in self-help settings

John M. Majer, Leonard A. Jason, Carol S North, Joseph R. Ferrari, Nicole S. Porter, Bradley Olson, Margaret Davis, Darrin Aase, J. Paul Molloy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

A longitudinal analysis of psychiatric severity was conducted with a national sample of recovering substance abusers living in Oxford Houses, which are self-run, self-help settings. Outcomes related to residents' psychiatric severity were examined at three follow-up intervals over one year. Over time, Oxford House residents with high versus low baseline psychiatric severity reported significantly more days using psychiatric medication, decreased outpatient psychiatric treatment, yet no significant differences for number of days abstinent and time living in an Oxford House. These findings suggest that a high level of psychiatric severity is not an impediment to residing in self-run, self-help settings such as Oxford House among persons with psychiatric comorbid substance use disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)145-153
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Community Psychology
Volume42
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2008

Keywords

  • Addiction
  • Mental health
  • Oxford House
  • Psychiatric comorbid substance use disorders (PCSUDs)
  • Psychiatric comorbidity
  • Psychiatric severity
  • Self-help settings

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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