A method for safely resecting anterior butterfly gliomas: The surgical anatomy of the default mode network and the relevance of its preservation

Joshua D. Burks, Phillip A. Bonney, Andrew K. Conner, Chad A. Glenn, Robert G. Briggs, James D. Battiste, Tressie McCoy, Daniel L. O'Donoghue, Dee H. Wu, Michael E. Sughrue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE Gliomas invading the anterior corpus callosum are commonly deemed unresectable due to an unacceptable risk/benefit ratio, including the risk of abulia. In this study, the authors investigated the anatomy of the cingulum and its connectivity within the default mode network (DMN). A technique is described involving awake subcortical mapping with higher attention tasks to preserve the cingulum and reduce the incidence of postoperative abulia for patients with so-called butterfly gliomas. METHODS The authors reviewed clinical data on all patients undergoing glioma surgery performed by the senior author during a 4-year period at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. Forty patients were identified who underwent surgery for butterfly gliomas. Each patient was designated as having undergone surgery either with or without the use of awake subcortical mapping and preservation of the cingulum. Data recorded on these patients included the incidence of abulia/akinetic mutism. In the context of the study findings, the authors conducted a detailed anatomical study of the cingulum and its role within the DMN using postmortem fiber tract dissections of 10 cerebral hemispheres and in vivo diffusion tractography of 10 healthy subjects. RESULTS Forty patients with butterfly gliomas were treated, 25 (62%) with standard surgical methods and 15 (38%) with awake subcortical mapping and preservation of the cingulum. One patient (1/15, 7%) experienced postoperative abulia following surgery with the cingulum-sparing technique. Greater than 90% resection was achieved in 13/15 (87%) of these patients. CONCLUSIONS This study presents evidence that anterior butterfly gliomas can be safely removed using a novel, attention-Task based, awake brain surgery technique that focuses on preserving the anatomical connectivity of the cingulum and relevant aspects of the cingulate gyrus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1795-1811
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume126
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Keywords

  • Anatomy
  • Butterfly glioma
  • Cingulate gyrus
  • Cingulum
  • Connectivity
  • Corpus callosum
  • Default mode network
  • Dti
  • Glioblastoma
  • Oncology
  • Tractography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)
  • Clinical Neurology

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    Burks, J. D., Bonney, P. A., Conner, A. K., Glenn, C. A., Briggs, R. G., Battiste, J. D., McCoy, T., O'Donoghue, D. L., Wu, D. H., & Sughrue, M. E. (2017). A method for safely resecting anterior butterfly gliomas: The surgical anatomy of the default mode network and the relevance of its preservation. Journal of Neurosurgery, 126(6), 1795-1811. https://doi.org/10.3171/2016.5.JNS153006