A multisite randomized controlled trial of brief intervention to reduce drinking in the trauma care setting: How brief is brief?

Craig Field, Scott Walters, C. Nathan Marti, Jina Jun, Michael Foreman, Carlos Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Determine the efficacy of 3 brief intervention strategies that address heavy drinking among injured patients. BACKGROUND: The content or structure of brief interventions most effective at reducing alcohol misuse after traumatic injury is not known. METHODS: Injured patients from 3 trauma centers were screened for heavy drinking and randomly assigned to brief advice (n = 200), brief motivational intervention (BMI) (n = 203), or BMI plus a telephone booster using personalized feedback or BMI + B (n = 193). Among those randomly assigned, 57% met criteria for moderate to severe alcohol problems. The primary drinking outcomes were assessed at 3, 6, and 12 months. RESULTS: Compared with brief advice and BMI, BMI + B showed significant reductions in the number of standard drinks consumed per week at 3 (Δ adjusted means: -1.22, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.99, approximately -1.49, P = 0.01) and 6 months (Δ adjusted means: -1.42, 95% CI: -1.14, approximately -1.76, P = 0.02), percent days of heavy drinking at 6 months (Δ adjusted means: -5.90, 95% CI: -11.40, approximately -0.40, P = 0.04), maximum number of standard drinks consumed in 1 day at 3 (Δ adjusted means: -1.38, 95% CI: -1.18, approximately -1.62, P = 0.003) and 12 months (Δ adjusted means: -1.71, 95% CI: -1.47, approximately -1.99, P = 0.02), and number of standard drinks consumed per drinking day at 3 (Δ adjusted means: -1.49, 95% CI: -1.35, approximately -1.65, P = 0.002) and 6 months (Δ adjusted means: -1.28, 95% CI: -1.17, approximately -1.40, P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Brief interventions based on motivational interviewing with a telephone booster using personalized feedback were most effective at achieving reductions in alcohol intake across the 3 trauma centers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)873-880
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Surgery
Volume259
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Drinking
Randomized Controlled Trials
Confidence Intervals
Wounds and Injuries
Trauma Centers
Alcohols
Telephone
Motivational Interviewing

Keywords

  • at-risk drinking
  • brief intervention
  • multisite
  • randomized controlled trial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

A multisite randomized controlled trial of brief intervention to reduce drinking in the trauma care setting : How brief is brief? / Field, Craig; Walters, Scott; Marti, C. Nathan; Jun, Jina; Foreman, Michael; Brown, Carlos.

In: Annals of Surgery, Vol. 259, No. 5, 2014, p. 873-880.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Field, Craig ; Walters, Scott ; Marti, C. Nathan ; Jun, Jina ; Foreman, Michael ; Brown, Carlos. / A multisite randomized controlled trial of brief intervention to reduce drinking in the trauma care setting : How brief is brief?. In: Annals of Surgery. 2014 ; Vol. 259, No. 5. pp. 873-880.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Determine the efficacy of 3 brief intervention strategies that address heavy drinking among injured patients. BACKGROUND: The content or structure of brief interventions most effective at reducing alcohol misuse after traumatic injury is not known. METHODS: Injured patients from 3 trauma centers were screened for heavy drinking and randomly assigned to brief advice (n = 200), brief motivational intervention (BMI) (n = 203), or BMI plus a telephone booster using personalized feedback or BMI + B (n = 193). Among those randomly assigned, 57{\%} met criteria for moderate to severe alcohol problems. The primary drinking outcomes were assessed at 3, 6, and 12 months. RESULTS: Compared with brief advice and BMI, BMI + B showed significant reductions in the number of standard drinks consumed per week at 3 (Δ adjusted means: -1.22, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: -0.99, approximately -1.49, P = 0.01) and 6 months (Δ adjusted means: -1.42, 95{\%} CI: -1.14, approximately -1.76, P = 0.02), percent days of heavy drinking at 6 months (Δ adjusted means: -5.90, 95{\%} CI: -11.40, approximately -0.40, P = 0.04), maximum number of standard drinks consumed in 1 day at 3 (Δ adjusted means: -1.38, 95{\%} CI: -1.18, approximately -1.62, P = 0.003) and 12 months (Δ adjusted means: -1.71, 95{\%} CI: -1.47, approximately -1.99, P = 0.02), and number of standard drinks consumed per drinking day at 3 (Δ adjusted means: -1.49, 95{\%} CI: -1.35, approximately -1.65, P = 0.002) and 6 months (Δ adjusted means: -1.28, 95{\%} CI: -1.17, approximately -1.40, P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Brief interventions based on motivational interviewing with a telephone booster using personalized feedback were most effective at achieving reductions in alcohol intake across the 3 trauma centers.",
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T1 - A multisite randomized controlled trial of brief intervention to reduce drinking in the trauma care setting

T2 - How brief is brief?

AU - Field, Craig

AU - Walters, Scott

AU - Marti, C. Nathan

AU - Jun, Jina

AU - Foreman, Michael

AU - Brown, Carlos

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Determine the efficacy of 3 brief intervention strategies that address heavy drinking among injured patients. BACKGROUND: The content or structure of brief interventions most effective at reducing alcohol misuse after traumatic injury is not known. METHODS: Injured patients from 3 trauma centers were screened for heavy drinking and randomly assigned to brief advice (n = 200), brief motivational intervention (BMI) (n = 203), or BMI plus a telephone booster using personalized feedback or BMI + B (n = 193). Among those randomly assigned, 57% met criteria for moderate to severe alcohol problems. The primary drinking outcomes were assessed at 3, 6, and 12 months. RESULTS: Compared with brief advice and BMI, BMI + B showed significant reductions in the number of standard drinks consumed per week at 3 (Δ adjusted means: -1.22, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.99, approximately -1.49, P = 0.01) and 6 months (Δ adjusted means: -1.42, 95% CI: -1.14, approximately -1.76, P = 0.02), percent days of heavy drinking at 6 months (Δ adjusted means: -5.90, 95% CI: -11.40, approximately -0.40, P = 0.04), maximum number of standard drinks consumed in 1 day at 3 (Δ adjusted means: -1.38, 95% CI: -1.18, approximately -1.62, P = 0.003) and 12 months (Δ adjusted means: -1.71, 95% CI: -1.47, approximately -1.99, P = 0.02), and number of standard drinks consumed per drinking day at 3 (Δ adjusted means: -1.49, 95% CI: -1.35, approximately -1.65, P = 0.002) and 6 months (Δ adjusted means: -1.28, 95% CI: -1.17, approximately -1.40, P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Brief interventions based on motivational interviewing with a telephone booster using personalized feedback were most effective at achieving reductions in alcohol intake across the 3 trauma centers.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Determine the efficacy of 3 brief intervention strategies that address heavy drinking among injured patients. BACKGROUND: The content or structure of brief interventions most effective at reducing alcohol misuse after traumatic injury is not known. METHODS: Injured patients from 3 trauma centers were screened for heavy drinking and randomly assigned to brief advice (n = 200), brief motivational intervention (BMI) (n = 203), or BMI plus a telephone booster using personalized feedback or BMI + B (n = 193). Among those randomly assigned, 57% met criteria for moderate to severe alcohol problems. The primary drinking outcomes were assessed at 3, 6, and 12 months. RESULTS: Compared with brief advice and BMI, BMI + B showed significant reductions in the number of standard drinks consumed per week at 3 (Δ adjusted means: -1.22, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.99, approximately -1.49, P = 0.01) and 6 months (Δ adjusted means: -1.42, 95% CI: -1.14, approximately -1.76, P = 0.02), percent days of heavy drinking at 6 months (Δ adjusted means: -5.90, 95% CI: -11.40, approximately -0.40, P = 0.04), maximum number of standard drinks consumed in 1 day at 3 (Δ adjusted means: -1.38, 95% CI: -1.18, approximately -1.62, P = 0.003) and 12 months (Δ adjusted means: -1.71, 95% CI: -1.47, approximately -1.99, P = 0.02), and number of standard drinks consumed per drinking day at 3 (Δ adjusted means: -1.49, 95% CI: -1.35, approximately -1.65, P = 0.002) and 6 months (Δ adjusted means: -1.28, 95% CI: -1.17, approximately -1.40, P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Brief interventions based on motivational interviewing with a telephone booster using personalized feedback were most effective at achieving reductions in alcohol intake across the 3 trauma centers.

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