A mutation in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene (RAD3) required for nucleotide excision repair and transcription increases the efficiency of mismatch correction

Yingying Yang, Anthony L. Johnson, Leland H. Johnston, Wolfram Siede, Errol C. Friedberg, Karthikeyan Ramachandran, Bernard A. Kunz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

RAD3 functions in DNA repair and transcription in Saccharomyces and particular rad3 alleles confer a mutator phenotype, possibly as a consequences of defective mismatch correction. We assessed the potential involvement of the Rad3 protein in mismatch correction by comparing heteroduplex repair in isogenic rad3-1 and wild-type strains. The rad3-1 allele increased the spontaneous mutation rate but did not prevent heteroduplex repair or bias its directionality. Instead, the efficiency of mismatch correction was enhanced in the rad3-1 strain. This surprising result prompted us to examine expression of yeast mismatch repair genes. We determined that MSH2, but not MLH1, is transcriptionally regulated during the cell-cycle like PMS1, and that rad3-1 does not increase the transcript levels for these genes in log phase cells. These observations suggest that the rad3- 1 mutation gives rise to an enhanced efficiency of mismatch correction via a process that does not involved transcriptional regulation of mismatch repair. Interestingly, mismatch repair also was more efficient when error-editing by yeast DNA polymerase δ was eliminated. We discuss our results in relation to possible mechanisms that may link the rad3-1 mutation to mismatch correction efficiency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-466
Number of pages8
JournalGenetics
Volume144
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1996

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DNA Mismatch Repair
DNA Repair
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Mutation
Yeasts
Alleles
Genes
Saccharomyces
Mutation Rate
DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase
Cell Cycle
Phenotype
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

A mutation in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene (RAD3) required for nucleotide excision repair and transcription increases the efficiency of mismatch correction. / Yang, Yingying; Johnson, Anthony L.; Johnston, Leland H.; Siede, Wolfram; Friedberg, Errol C.; Ramachandran, Karthikeyan; Kunz, Bernard A.

In: Genetics, Vol. 144, No. 2, 1996, p. 459-466.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yang, Yingying ; Johnson, Anthony L. ; Johnston, Leland H. ; Siede, Wolfram ; Friedberg, Errol C. ; Ramachandran, Karthikeyan ; Kunz, Bernard A. / A mutation in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene (RAD3) required for nucleotide excision repair and transcription increases the efficiency of mismatch correction. In: Genetics. 1996 ; Vol. 144, No. 2. pp. 459-466.
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AU - Friedberg, Errol C.

AU - Ramachandran, Karthikeyan

AU - Kunz, Bernard A.

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