A national point-prevalence survey of pediatric intensive care unit-acquired infections in the United States

Lisa A. Grohskopf, Ronda L. Sinkowitz-Cochran, Denise O. Garrett, Annette H. Sohn, Gail L. Levine, Jane D. Siegel, Beth H. Stover, William R. Jarvis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: To determine the prevalence of intensive care unit-acquired infections, a major cause of morbidity in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) patients. Methods: Pediatric Prevention Network hospitals (n = 31) participated in a point-prevalence survey on August 4, 1999. Data collected for all PICU inpatients included demographics, infections, therapeutic interventions, and outcomes. Results: There were 512 patients in 35 PICUs. The median age was 2.2 years (range, <1 day-35.4 years). Seventy-five PICU-acquired infections occurred among 61 (11.9%) patients. The most frequently reported sites were bloodstream (31 [41.3%]), lower respiratory tract (17 [22.7%]), urinary tract (10 [13.3%]), or skin/soft tissue (6 [8.0%]). The most frequent pathogens were coagulase-negative staphylococci (in 16 [21.3%] infections), Candida spp. (13 [17.3%]), enterococci (10 [13.3%]), Staphylacoccus aureus (9 [12.0%]), or Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8 [10.7%]). Age-adjusted risk factors for infection included central intravenous catheters (relative risk [RR], 4.1; 95% confidence intervals [CI], 2.4-7.1), arterial catheters (RR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.5-3.9), total parenteral nutrition (RR, 5.5; 95% CI, 3.6-8.5), or mechanical ventilation (RR, 3.9; 95% CI, 2.2-6.8). Infection was associated with higher age-adjusted risk of death within 4 weeks of the survey (RR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.7-6.5). Conclusions: This national multicenter study documented the high prevalence of PICU-acquired infections. Preventing these infections should be a national priority.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)432-438
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume140
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

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Pediatric Intensive Care Units
Infection
Confidence Intervals
Catheters
Surveys and Questionnaires
Total Parenteral Nutrition
Coagulase
Enterococcus
Urinary Tract
Staphylococcus
Candida
Artificial Respiration
Respiratory System
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Multicenter Studies
Intensive Care Units
Inpatients
Demography
Pediatrics
Morbidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Grohskopf, L. A., Sinkowitz-Cochran, R. L., Garrett, D. O., Sohn, A. H., Levine, G. L., Siegel, J. D., ... Jarvis, W. R. (2002). A national point-prevalence survey of pediatric intensive care unit-acquired infections in the United States. Journal of Pediatrics, 140(4), 432-438. https://doi.org/10.1067/mpd.2002.122499

A national point-prevalence survey of pediatric intensive care unit-acquired infections in the United States. / Grohskopf, Lisa A.; Sinkowitz-Cochran, Ronda L.; Garrett, Denise O.; Sohn, Annette H.; Levine, Gail L.; Siegel, Jane D.; Stover, Beth H.; Jarvis, William R.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 140, No. 4, 2002, p. 432-438.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grohskopf, LA, Sinkowitz-Cochran, RL, Garrett, DO, Sohn, AH, Levine, GL, Siegel, JD, Stover, BH & Jarvis, WR 2002, 'A national point-prevalence survey of pediatric intensive care unit-acquired infections in the United States', Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 140, no. 4, pp. 432-438. https://doi.org/10.1067/mpd.2002.122499
Grohskopf, Lisa A. ; Sinkowitz-Cochran, Ronda L. ; Garrett, Denise O. ; Sohn, Annette H. ; Levine, Gail L. ; Siegel, Jane D. ; Stover, Beth H. ; Jarvis, William R. / A national point-prevalence survey of pediatric intensive care unit-acquired infections in the United States. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2002 ; Vol. 140, No. 4. pp. 432-438.
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abstract = "Objective: To determine the prevalence of intensive care unit-acquired infections, a major cause of morbidity in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) patients. Methods: Pediatric Prevention Network hospitals (n = 31) participated in a point-prevalence survey on August 4, 1999. Data collected for all PICU inpatients included demographics, infections, therapeutic interventions, and outcomes. Results: There were 512 patients in 35 PICUs. The median age was 2.2 years (range, <1 day-35.4 years). Seventy-five PICU-acquired infections occurred among 61 (11.9{\%}) patients. The most frequently reported sites were bloodstream (31 [41.3{\%}]), lower respiratory tract (17 [22.7{\%}]), urinary tract (10 [13.3{\%}]), or skin/soft tissue (6 [8.0{\%}]). The most frequent pathogens were coagulase-negative staphylococci (in 16 [21.3{\%}] infections), Candida spp. (13 [17.3{\%}]), enterococci (10 [13.3{\%}]), Staphylacoccus aureus (9 [12.0{\%}]), or Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8 [10.7{\%}]). Age-adjusted risk factors for infection included central intravenous catheters (relative risk [RR], 4.1; 95{\%} confidence intervals [CI], 2.4-7.1), arterial catheters (RR, 2.4; 95{\%} CI, 1.5-3.9), total parenteral nutrition (RR, 5.5; 95{\%} CI, 3.6-8.5), or mechanical ventilation (RR, 3.9; 95{\%} CI, 2.2-6.8). Infection was associated with higher age-adjusted risk of death within 4 weeks of the survey (RR, 3.4; 95{\%} CI, 1.7-6.5). Conclusions: This national multicenter study documented the high prevalence of PICU-acquired infections. Preventing these infections should be a national priority.",
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AU - Sinkowitz-Cochran, Ronda L.

AU - Garrett, Denise O.

AU - Sohn, Annette H.

AU - Levine, Gail L.

AU - Siegel, Jane D.

AU - Stover, Beth H.

AU - Jarvis, William R.

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N2 - Objective: To determine the prevalence of intensive care unit-acquired infections, a major cause of morbidity in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) patients. Methods: Pediatric Prevention Network hospitals (n = 31) participated in a point-prevalence survey on August 4, 1999. Data collected for all PICU inpatients included demographics, infections, therapeutic interventions, and outcomes. Results: There were 512 patients in 35 PICUs. The median age was 2.2 years (range, <1 day-35.4 years). Seventy-five PICU-acquired infections occurred among 61 (11.9%) patients. The most frequently reported sites were bloodstream (31 [41.3%]), lower respiratory tract (17 [22.7%]), urinary tract (10 [13.3%]), or skin/soft tissue (6 [8.0%]). The most frequent pathogens were coagulase-negative staphylococci (in 16 [21.3%] infections), Candida spp. (13 [17.3%]), enterococci (10 [13.3%]), Staphylacoccus aureus (9 [12.0%]), or Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8 [10.7%]). Age-adjusted risk factors for infection included central intravenous catheters (relative risk [RR], 4.1; 95% confidence intervals [CI], 2.4-7.1), arterial catheters (RR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.5-3.9), total parenteral nutrition (RR, 5.5; 95% CI, 3.6-8.5), or mechanical ventilation (RR, 3.9; 95% CI, 2.2-6.8). Infection was associated with higher age-adjusted risk of death within 4 weeks of the survey (RR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.7-6.5). Conclusions: This national multicenter study documented the high prevalence of PICU-acquired infections. Preventing these infections should be a national priority.

AB - Objective: To determine the prevalence of intensive care unit-acquired infections, a major cause of morbidity in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) patients. Methods: Pediatric Prevention Network hospitals (n = 31) participated in a point-prevalence survey on August 4, 1999. Data collected for all PICU inpatients included demographics, infections, therapeutic interventions, and outcomes. Results: There were 512 patients in 35 PICUs. The median age was 2.2 years (range, <1 day-35.4 years). Seventy-five PICU-acquired infections occurred among 61 (11.9%) patients. The most frequently reported sites were bloodstream (31 [41.3%]), lower respiratory tract (17 [22.7%]), urinary tract (10 [13.3%]), or skin/soft tissue (6 [8.0%]). The most frequent pathogens were coagulase-negative staphylococci (in 16 [21.3%] infections), Candida spp. (13 [17.3%]), enterococci (10 [13.3%]), Staphylacoccus aureus (9 [12.0%]), or Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8 [10.7%]). Age-adjusted risk factors for infection included central intravenous catheters (relative risk [RR], 4.1; 95% confidence intervals [CI], 2.4-7.1), arterial catheters (RR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.5-3.9), total parenteral nutrition (RR, 5.5; 95% CI, 3.6-8.5), or mechanical ventilation (RR, 3.9; 95% CI, 2.2-6.8). Infection was associated with higher age-adjusted risk of death within 4 weeks of the survey (RR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.7-6.5). Conclusions: This national multicenter study documented the high prevalence of PICU-acquired infections. Preventing these infections should be a national priority.

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