A nonoxidative sensor based on a self-doped polyaniline/carbon nanotube composite for sensitive and selective detection of the neurotransmitter dopamine

Shah R. Ali, Yufeng Ma, Rishi R. Parajuli, Yetunde Balogun, Warren Y.C. Lai, Huixin He

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Most of the current techniques for detection of dopamine exploit its ease of oxidation. However, the oxidative approaches suffer from a common problem. The products of dopamine oxidation can react with ascorbic acid present in samples and regenerate dopamine again, which severely limits the accuracy of detection. In this paper, we report a nonoxidative approach to electrochemically detect dopamine with high sensitivity and selectivity. This approach takes advantage of the high performance of our newly developed poly(anilineboronic acid)/carbon nano-tube composite and the excellent permselectivity of the ion-exchange polymer Nafion. The binding of dopamine to the boronic acid groups of the polymer with large affinity affects the electrochemical properties of the polyaniline backbone, which act as the transduction mechanism of this nonoxidative dopamine sensor. The unique reduction capability and high conductivity of single-stranded DNA functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes greatly improved the electrochemical activity of the polymer in physiological buffer, and the large surface area of the carbon nanotubes largely increased the density of the boronic acid receptors. The high sensitivity along with the improved selectivity of this sensing approach is a significant step forward toward molecular diagnosis of Parkinson's disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2583-2587
Number of pages5
JournalAnalytical Chemistry
Volume79
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2007
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry

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