A note on methodological fallacies in the "X% fallacy" literature.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article demonstrates that the numerical estimate of an approximately 25 percent risk of nursing home institutionalization reported in the "4-5% fallacy" literature is based on an invalid set of implicit assumptions. Using the most recent national level statistics on nursing home residency and discharge, a measurement technique is introduced to provide an estimate of the maximum and minimum number of nursing home residents in 1976, and a corresponding range for the annualized risk of institutionalization between 6 and 9 percent, within which the true risk must lie.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-69
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Aging and Human Development
Volume17
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1983

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Nursing Homes
Institutionalization
Internship and Residency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

A note on methodological fallacies in the "X% fallacy" literature. / McConnel, C. E.

In: International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Vol. 17, No. 1, 1983, p. 57-69.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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