A pediatric weight management program for high-risk populations: A preliminary analysis

Joseph A. Skelton, Laure G. DeMattia, Glenn Flores

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether a multidisciplinary pediatric weight management program effectively improves BMI, BMI z-score, and cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) in high-risk populations. Methods and Procedures: A retrospective chart review was performed on children seen in the NEW Kids Program at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, a family-based clinic that treats pediatric obesity using medical management, nutrition education, behavioral intervention, and physical activity. Inclusion criteria were program participation for ≥9 months and >4 visits. Analyses were performed to identify factors associated with pre- to postintervention changes in BMI, BMI z-score, and CVRF laboratory values. Results: A total of 66 patients met inclusion criteria; the mean age was 11 years (s.d. ± 3.4), 56% were racial/ethnic minorities, 45% were Medicaid recipients, 48% resided in impoverished communities, and 38% had a BMI ≥40 kg/m2. Of the 66 patients, 91% had more than one weight-related comorbidity, 88% had CVRFs, and the preintervention mean BMI was 37 kg/m2. After the intervention, there was an overall increase in absolute BMI, but a small, yet significant decrease in BMI z-score (mean -0.03 ± 0.16; P < 0.05). There were significant pregroup to postgroup improvements in total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides levels (P < 0.05). Insurance coverage, race/ethnicity, gender, age, and initial BMI were not significantly associated with changes in BMI or BMI z-score. Discussion: A multidisciplinary pediatric weight management program can improve the weight status of high-risk populations, including minorities, Medicaid recipients, patients with multiple comorbidities and CVRFs, and the severely obese.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1698-1701
Number of pages4
JournalObesity
Volume16
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

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Pediatrics
Weights and Measures
Medicaid
Population
Comorbidity
Insurance Coverage
Pediatric Obesity
Cholesterol
Exercise
Education
low density lipoprotein triglyceride

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

A pediatric weight management program for high-risk populations : A preliminary analysis. / Skelton, Joseph A.; DeMattia, Laure G.; Flores, Glenn.

In: Obesity, Vol. 16, No. 7, 07.2008, p. 1698-1701.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Skelton, Joseph A. ; DeMattia, Laure G. ; Flores, Glenn. / A pediatric weight management program for high-risk populations : A preliminary analysis. In: Obesity. 2008 ; Vol. 16, No. 7. pp. 1698-1701.
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