A randomized, controlled trial of a school-based intervention to reduce violence and substance use in predominantly Latino high school students

Rashmi Shetgiri, Sheryl Kataoka, Hua Lin, Glenn Flores

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Few studies have rigorously evaluated school-based interventions to reduce violence and substance use in high school students, especially Latinos. This study assessed the effects of a school-based program on reducing violence and substance use among primarily Latino high school students. Methods: Ninth-grade students at risk for violence and substance use were randomized to intervention or control groups. The intervention was based on an existing program developed for white and African American youth. Data on smoking, alcohol and drug use, fighting, and grades were collected at baseline and 4 and 8 months post enrollment. Results: There were 55 students in the control and 53 in the intervention group; 74% of controls and 78% of intervention students were Latino. There were no significant changes in fighting, smoking, or alcohol or drug use, from baseline to 8-month follow-up, between the intervention and control group. Pre and post grade point average (GPA) decreased from 2.3 at baseline to 1.8 at follow-up (p < .01) in the intervention group, with no significant between-group changes in GPA from baseline to follow-up. Conclusions: This school-based program showed no reduction in violence or substance use. The findings suggest that a program targeting non-Latino youth may not be optimal for reducing violence and substance use in Latinos; greater attention to cultural appropriateness and racial/ethnic differences may be needed. There was a decrease in interventiongroup GPA but no significant change compared with controls. Further studies of the impact of school-based substance use and violence prevention programs on academics, and the effectiveness of afterschool or community-based programs compared to school-based programs are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)932-940
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume103
Issue number9-10
StatePublished - Sep 2011

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Hispanic Americans
Violence
Randomized Controlled Trials
Students
Smoking
Alcohols
Control Groups
Pharmaceutical Preparations
African Americans

Keywords

  • Children/adolescents
  • Latinos
  • Randomized controlled trial
  • Risk behaviors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A randomized, controlled trial of a school-based intervention to reduce violence and substance use in predominantly Latino high school students. / Shetgiri, Rashmi; Kataoka, Sheryl; Lin, Hua; Flores, Glenn.

In: Journal of the National Medical Association, Vol. 103, No. 9-10, 09.2011, p. 932-940.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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