A randomized trial of concurrent smoking-cessation and substance use disorder treatment in stimulant-dependent smokers

Theresa M. Winhusen, Gregory S. Brigham, Frankie Kropp, Robert Lindblad, John G. Gardin, Pat Penn, Candace Hodgkins, Thomas M. Kelly, Antoine Douaihy, Michael McCann, Lee D. Love, Eliot DeGravelles, Ken Bachrach, Susan C. Sonne, Bob Hiott, Louise Haynes, Gaurav Sharma, Daniel F. Lewis, Paul Van Veldhuisen, Jeff Theobald & 1 others Udi Ghitza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the impact of concurrent treatments for substance use disorder and nicotine-dependence for stimulant-dependent patients. Method: A randomized, 10-week trial with follow-up at 3 and 6 months after smoking quit date conducted at 12 substance use disorder treatment programs between February 2010 and July 2012. Adults meeting D5M-IV-TR criteria for cocaine and/or methamphetamine dependence and interested in quitting smoking were randomized to treatment as usual (n 271) or treatment as usual with smoking- cessation treatment (n 267). All participants received treatment as usual for substance use disorder treatment. Participants assigned to treatment as usual with concurrent smoking-cessation treatment received weekly individual smoking cessation counseling and extended- release bupropion (300 mg/d) during weeks 1 10. During post-quit treatment (weeks 4 10), participants assigned to treatment as usual with smoking-cessation treatment received a nicotine inhaler and contingency management for smoking abstinence. Weekly proportion of stimulant- abstinent participants during the treatment phase, as assessed by urine drug screens and self-report, was the primary outcome. Secondary measures included other substance/nicotine use outcomes and treatment attendance. Results:There were no significant treatment effects on stimulant-use outcomes, as measured by the primary outcome and stimulant-free days, on drug-abstinence, oron attendance. Participants assigned to treatment as usual with smoking-cessation treatment, relative to those assigned to treatment as usual, had significantly better outcomes for drug-free days at 6 month follow up (X2i 4.09, P <.05), with a decrease in drug-free days from baseline of 1 .3°o in treatment as usual with smoking cessation treatment and of 7.6°o in treatment as usual. Participants receiving treatment as usual with smoking-cessation treatment, relative to those receiving treatment as usual, had significantly better outcomes on smoking point prevalence abstinence (25.5°o vs 2.2°o; X2i 44.69, P<.001;OR 18.2). Conclusions:These results suggest that providing smoking-cessation treatment tu illicit stimulant-dependent patients in outpatient substance use disorder treatment will not worsen, and may enhance, abstinence from nonnicotine substance use. Trial Registration: Clinica ITria ls.gov identifier: NCTO 1077024

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)336-343
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychiatry
Volume75
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Smoking Cessation
Substance-Related Disorders
Withholding Treatment
Therapeutics
Smoking
Substance Use
Nicotine
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Bupropion
Tobacco Use Disorder
Methamphetamine
Nebulizers and Vaporizers
Cocaine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Winhusen, T. M., Brigham, G. S., Kropp, F., Lindblad, R., Gardin, J. G., Penn, P., ... Ghitza, U. (2014). A randomized trial of concurrent smoking-cessation and substance use disorder treatment in stimulant-dependent smokers. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 75(4), 336-343. https://doi.org/10.4088/JCR.13m08449

A randomized trial of concurrent smoking-cessation and substance use disorder treatment in stimulant-dependent smokers. / Winhusen, Theresa M.; Brigham, Gregory S.; Kropp, Frankie; Lindblad, Robert; Gardin, John G.; Penn, Pat; Hodgkins, Candace; Kelly, Thomas M.; Douaihy, Antoine; McCann, Michael; Love, Lee D.; DeGravelles, Eliot; Bachrach, Ken; Sonne, Susan C.; Hiott, Bob; Haynes, Louise; Sharma, Gaurav; Lewis, Daniel F.; Van Veldhuisen, Paul; Theobald, Jeff; Ghitza, Udi.

In: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, Vol. 75, No. 4, 2014, p. 336-343.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Winhusen, TM, Brigham, GS, Kropp, F, Lindblad, R, Gardin, JG, Penn, P, Hodgkins, C, Kelly, TM, Douaihy, A, McCann, M, Love, LD, DeGravelles, E, Bachrach, K, Sonne, SC, Hiott, B, Haynes, L, Sharma, G, Lewis, DF, Van Veldhuisen, P, Theobald, J & Ghitza, U 2014, 'A randomized trial of concurrent smoking-cessation and substance use disorder treatment in stimulant-dependent smokers', Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, vol. 75, no. 4, pp. 336-343. https://doi.org/10.4088/JCR.13m08449
Winhusen, Theresa M. ; Brigham, Gregory S. ; Kropp, Frankie ; Lindblad, Robert ; Gardin, John G. ; Penn, Pat ; Hodgkins, Candace ; Kelly, Thomas M. ; Douaihy, Antoine ; McCann, Michael ; Love, Lee D. ; DeGravelles, Eliot ; Bachrach, Ken ; Sonne, Susan C. ; Hiott, Bob ; Haynes, Louise ; Sharma, Gaurav ; Lewis, Daniel F. ; Van Veldhuisen, Paul ; Theobald, Jeff ; Ghitza, Udi. / A randomized trial of concurrent smoking-cessation and substance use disorder treatment in stimulant-dependent smokers. In: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. 2014 ; Vol. 75, No. 4. pp. 336-343.
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AU - Winhusen, Theresa M.

AU - Brigham, Gregory S.

AU - Kropp, Frankie

AU - Lindblad, Robert

AU - Gardin, John G.

AU - Penn, Pat

AU - Hodgkins, Candace

AU - Kelly, Thomas M.

AU - Douaihy, Antoine

AU - McCann, Michael

AU - Love, Lee D.

AU - DeGravelles, Eliot

AU - Bachrach, Ken

AU - Sonne, Susan C.

AU - Hiott, Bob

AU - Haynes, Louise

AU - Sharma, Gaurav

AU - Lewis, Daniel F.

AU - Van Veldhuisen, Paul

AU - Theobald, Jeff

AU - Ghitza, Udi

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N2 - Objective: To evaluate the impact of concurrent treatments for substance use disorder and nicotine-dependence for stimulant-dependent patients. Method: A randomized, 10-week trial with follow-up at 3 and 6 months after smoking quit date conducted at 12 substance use disorder treatment programs between February 2010 and July 2012. Adults meeting D5M-IV-TR criteria for cocaine and/or methamphetamine dependence and interested in quitting smoking were randomized to treatment as usual (n 271) or treatment as usual with smoking- cessation treatment (n 267). All participants received treatment as usual for substance use disorder treatment. Participants assigned to treatment as usual with concurrent smoking-cessation treatment received weekly individual smoking cessation counseling and extended- release bupropion (300 mg/d) during weeks 1 10. During post-quit treatment (weeks 4 10), participants assigned to treatment as usual with smoking-cessation treatment received a nicotine inhaler and contingency management for smoking abstinence. Weekly proportion of stimulant- abstinent participants during the treatment phase, as assessed by urine drug screens and self-report, was the primary outcome. Secondary measures included other substance/nicotine use outcomes and treatment attendance. Results:There were no significant treatment effects on stimulant-use outcomes, as measured by the primary outcome and stimulant-free days, on drug-abstinence, oron attendance. Participants assigned to treatment as usual with smoking-cessation treatment, relative to those assigned to treatment as usual, had significantly better outcomes for drug-free days at 6 month follow up (X2i 4.09, P <.05), with a decrease in drug-free days from baseline of 1 .3°o in treatment as usual with smoking cessation treatment and of 7.6°o in treatment as usual. Participants receiving treatment as usual with smoking-cessation treatment, relative to those receiving treatment as usual, had significantly better outcomes on smoking point prevalence abstinence (25.5°o vs 2.2°o; X2i 44.69, P<.001;OR 18.2). Conclusions:These results suggest that providing smoking-cessation treatment tu illicit stimulant-dependent patients in outpatient substance use disorder treatment will not worsen, and may enhance, abstinence from nonnicotine substance use. Trial Registration: Clinica ITria ls.gov identifier: NCTO 1077024

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