A retrospective analysis of lingual nerve sensory changes after mandibular bilateral sagittal split osteotomy

Steven C. Jacks, John R Zuniga, Timothy A. Turvey, Curtis Schalit

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Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the patient-reported incidence, duration, and perceived deficit in daily activities associated with lingual nerve (LN) sensory changes after bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) of the mandible and to compare them with inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) sensory changes in the same study population. Materials and Methods: Questionnaires were mailed to 316 patients who had undergone BSSO procedures between 1980 and 1993. The patients were queried for perceived sensory changes in the distribution of the IAN and LN; duration of these sensory changes; and alteration in daily activities caused by these sensory changes. The same questionnaire was mailed to 47 patients who had undergone isolated genioplasty (GP) to control for the normal variance of non-BSSO surgery on perceived LN sensory changes. Results: Forty-three percent of the BSSO patients and 38% of the GP patients returned the questionnaires. Within the BSSO group, 19.4% reported LN sensory changes, of which 69.3% reported that these changes resolved within 1 year; 88% reported altered daily activities. By comparison, 95.5% reported a perceived IAN sensory change, of which 27.3% reported that these changes resolved within 1 year; 57% reported altered daily activities. Within the GP control group, 11% reported LN sensory changes; none of the reported sensory changes lasted longer than 1 month. Conclusions: A small percentage of patients report LN sensory changes after BSSO. When compared with IAN reported sensory changes, LN sensory changes resolve more frequently and sooner, but they are associated with greater perceived deficits in daily activity. The interpretation of the reported incidence of LN change must be critically reviewed because control subjects also responded positively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)700-705
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Volume56
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1998

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Lingual Nerve
Osteotomy
Mandibular Nerve
Genioplasty
Incidence
Mandible
Retrospective Studies
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Surgery

Cite this

A retrospective analysis of lingual nerve sensory changes after mandibular bilateral sagittal split osteotomy. / Jacks, Steven C.; Zuniga, John R; Turvey, Timothy A.; Schalit, Curtis.

In: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Vol. 56, No. 6, 06.1998, p. 700-705.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Purpose: The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the patient-reported incidence, duration, and perceived deficit in daily activities associated with lingual nerve (LN) sensory changes after bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) of the mandible and to compare them with inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) sensory changes in the same study population. Materials and Methods: Questionnaires were mailed to 316 patients who had undergone BSSO procedures between 1980 and 1993. The patients were queried for perceived sensory changes in the distribution of the IAN and LN; duration of these sensory changes; and alteration in daily activities caused by these sensory changes. The same questionnaire was mailed to 47 patients who had undergone isolated genioplasty (GP) to control for the normal variance of non-BSSO surgery on perceived LN sensory changes. Results: Forty-three percent of the BSSO patients and 38% of the GP patients returned the questionnaires. Within the BSSO group, 19.4% reported LN sensory changes, of which 69.3% reported that these changes resolved within 1 year; 88% reported altered daily activities. By comparison, 95.5% reported a perceived IAN sensory change, of which 27.3% reported that these changes resolved within 1 year; 57% reported altered daily activities. Within the GP control group, 11% reported LN sensory changes; none of the reported sensory changes lasted longer than 1 month. Conclusions: A small percentage of patients report LN sensory changes after BSSO. When compared with IAN reported sensory changes, LN sensory changes resolve more frequently and sooner, but they are associated with greater perceived deficits in daily activity. The interpretation of the reported incidence of LN change must be critically reviewed because control subjects also responded positively.

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