A rhinovirus outbreak among residents of a long-term care facility

T. G. Wald, P. Shult, P. Krause, B. A. Miller, P. Drinka, S. Gravenstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To describe the epidemiology of and clinical findings associated with a rhinovirus outbreak that occurred among institutionalized elderly persons. Design: Retrospective review of medical records and nursing surveillance reports. Setting: A 685-bed, long-term care facility for veterans and their spouses. Patients: 33 persons from whom rhinovirus was cultured. Measurements: Throat and nasopharyngeal virus culture; review of medical records to determine underlying diseases, signs and symptoms of respiratory illness, illness duration, and interventions during illness; and review of nursing surveillance reports to determine room locations of ill persons. Results: Between 14 August and 2 September 1993, the number of respiratory illnesses increased. Throat and nasopharyngeal virus cultures were taken from 67 ill residents; 33 cultures yielded rhinovirus, and no other respiratory virus was isolated. Geographic clustering of persons infected with rhinovirus was observed. Of those persons with rhinovirus infections, 100% had upper respiratory symptoms, 34% had gastrointestinal symptoms, 71% had systemic symptoms, 66% had lower respiratory symptoms (including productive cough), and 52% had new abnormalities on lung auscultation. The 17 persons with rhinovirus infection who had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease had more severe illnesses: Five (29%) required glucocorticoid or bronchodilator therapy for illness-associated bronchospasm; 2 required transfer out of the facility; 1 developed a radiographically documented infiltrate; and 1 died of respiratory failure. Conclusions: Rhinovirus may cause epidemic, clinically important respiratory illness in nursing home residents. A large proportion of residents may become ill, and infection may be severe in persons with underlying lung disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)588-593
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Internal Medicine
Volume123
Issue number8
StatePublished - 1995

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Rhinovirus
Long-Term Care
Disease Outbreaks
Pharynx
Viruses
Medical Records
Respiratory Signs and Symptoms
Nursing
Infection
Auscultation
Institutionalization
Bronchial Spasm
Bronchodilator Agents
Veterans
Nursing Homes
Spouses
Cough
Respiratory Insufficiency
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Glucocorticoids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Wald, T. G., Shult, P., Krause, P., Miller, B. A., Drinka, P., & Gravenstein, S. (1995). A rhinovirus outbreak among residents of a long-term care facility. Annals of Internal Medicine, 123(8), 588-593.

A rhinovirus outbreak among residents of a long-term care facility. / Wald, T. G.; Shult, P.; Krause, P.; Miller, B. A.; Drinka, P.; Gravenstein, S.

In: Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 123, No. 8, 1995, p. 588-593.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wald, TG, Shult, P, Krause, P, Miller, BA, Drinka, P & Gravenstein, S 1995, 'A rhinovirus outbreak among residents of a long-term care facility', Annals of Internal Medicine, vol. 123, no. 8, pp. 588-593.
Wald TG, Shult P, Krause P, Miller BA, Drinka P, Gravenstein S. A rhinovirus outbreak among residents of a long-term care facility. Annals of Internal Medicine. 1995;123(8):588-593.
Wald, T. G. ; Shult, P. ; Krause, P. ; Miller, B. A. ; Drinka, P. ; Gravenstein, S. / A rhinovirus outbreak among residents of a long-term care facility. In: Annals of Internal Medicine. 1995 ; Vol. 123, No. 8. pp. 588-593.
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