A Systematic Comparison of African American and Non-African American Patients on Psychosocial Aspects of Hepatitis C Infection

Omar T. Sims, Barry A. Hong, Shaonin Ji, David E. Pollio, Carol S North

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare African American and non-African American hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients on self-reported symptoms of HCV liver disease and psychosocial characteristics commonly affected by it in a sample of 309 patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial. African Americans (n = 196) rated a higher reliance on religion/spirituality for coping with HCV compared to non-African Americans. This study’s findings are a basis for encouragement of public health efforts and programs to seek partnerships with African American faith and religious communities to identify and treat undiagnosed cases of HCV and promote HCV awareness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1764-1770
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Religion and Health
Volume57
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Hepatitis C
  • Race
  • Religion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Religious studies

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