Abnormalities in parentally rated executive function in methamphetamine/polysubstance exposed children

Brian J. Piper, Summer F. Acevedo, Galena K. Kolchugina, Robert W. Butler, Selena M. Corbett, Elizabeth B. Honeycutt, Michael J. Craytor, Jacob Raber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Methamphetamine/polysubstance abuse in women of childbearing age is a major concern because of the potential long-term detrimental effects on the brain function of the fetus following in utero exposure. A battery of established tests, including the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence, Conners' Continuous Performance Test II, Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Function, the CMS Family Pictures and Dot Location tests, the Spatial Span test from the WISC-IV-Integrated, and a recently developed spatial learning and memory measure (Memory Island), was used to assess the effects of prenatal drug exposure on neurobehavioral performance. Participants were 7 to 9 year old children from similar socioeconomic backgrounds who either had (N = 31) or had not (N = 35) been exposed to methamphetamine/polysubstance during pregnancy. Compared to unexposed children, exposed children showed pronounced elevations (i.e. more problems) in parental ratings of executive function, including behavioral regulation and metacognition. Exposed children also exhibited subtle reductions in spatial performance in the Memory Island test. In contrast, IQ, Spatial Span, Family Pictures, Dot Location, and vigilance performance were unaffected by prenatal drug exposure history. Thus, children of women who reported using methamphetamine and other recreational drugs during pregnancy showed a selective profile of abnormalities in parentally rated executive function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)432-439
Number of pages8
JournalPharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior
Volume98
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

Fingerprint

Methamphetamine
Executive Function
Data storage equipment
Islands
Street Drugs
Wechsler Scales
Pregnancy
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Brain
Intelligence
Fetus
History
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Learning
  • Neuropsychology
  • Nicotine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Pharmacology
  • Toxicology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Piper, B. J., Acevedo, S. F., Kolchugina, G. K., Butler, R. W., Corbett, S. M., Honeycutt, E. B., ... Raber, J. (2011). Abnormalities in parentally rated executive function in methamphetamine/polysubstance exposed children. Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, 98(3), 432-439. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pbb.2011.02.013

Abnormalities in parentally rated executive function in methamphetamine/polysubstance exposed children. / Piper, Brian J.; Acevedo, Summer F.; Kolchugina, Galena K.; Butler, Robert W.; Corbett, Selena M.; Honeycutt, Elizabeth B.; Craytor, Michael J.; Raber, Jacob.

In: Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, Vol. 98, No. 3, 05.2011, p. 432-439.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Piper, BJ, Acevedo, SF, Kolchugina, GK, Butler, RW, Corbett, SM, Honeycutt, EB, Craytor, MJ & Raber, J 2011, 'Abnormalities in parentally rated executive function in methamphetamine/polysubstance exposed children', Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, vol. 98, no. 3, pp. 432-439. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pbb.2011.02.013
Piper, Brian J. ; Acevedo, Summer F. ; Kolchugina, Galena K. ; Butler, Robert W. ; Corbett, Selena M. ; Honeycutt, Elizabeth B. ; Craytor, Michael J. ; Raber, Jacob. / Abnormalities in parentally rated executive function in methamphetamine/polysubstance exposed children. In: Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior. 2011 ; Vol. 98, No. 3. pp. 432-439.
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