Accidental ingestion of sustained release calcium channel blockers in children

Anne F. Brayer, Paul Wax

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the effects of small ingestions of sustained release calcium channel blockers (SR-CCBs) in young children and characterized current recommendations regarding monitoring after a suspected ingestion. A 2-part study was performed of pediatric calcium channel blocker (CCB) ingestion: first a telephone survey of 33 randomly selected Poison Control Centers (PCCs) from around the US concerning their recommended management of a small ingestion of sustained release calcium channel blocker in a child, and then a 5-y retrospective review of local cases of CCB ingestions in children under 4 y-of-age. The number of hours of medical observation recommended by the PCCs varied from ≤24 h (n=15, 45%) to <6 h (n=6, 18%). The retrospective chart review revealed that 19 of 29 local cases involved a SR-CCB, and 6 of these were thought to have ingested only 1 tablet. Observation time varied from >24 h to < 6 h in the 17 cases seen in an emergency department. No symptoms or vital sign abnormalities were reported in any case. Recommendations regarding duration of observation varied from <6 h to 24 h. Ingestion of a few SR-CCB tablets was not associated with symptoms, suggesting that admission and 24-h monitoring may not be necessary under those circumstances.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-106
Number of pages3
JournalVeterinary and Human Toxicology
Volume40
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1998

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calcium channel blockers
Calcium Channel Blockers
Eating
ingestion
Poison Control Centers
Poisons
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
Observation
Pediatrics
Monitoring
Telephone
Vital Signs
monitoring
Tablets
Hospital Emergency Service
duration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)
  • Toxicology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Accidental ingestion of sustained release calcium channel blockers in children. / Brayer, Anne F.; Wax, Paul.

In: Veterinary and Human Toxicology, Vol. 40, No. 2, 1998, p. 104-106.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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