Activation of multiple effector mechanisms to enhance tumor immunotherapy

J. A. Hank, M. R. Albertini, J. Schiller, P. M. Sondel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent technical advances have enabled the generation of clinical reagents for immunotherapy. Currently, treatment protocols combining both interleukin- 2 (IL-2) and tumor-specific monoclonal antibody are underway at the University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center and elsewhere. These approaches are based on the hypothesis that IL-2-activated lymphocytes will use tumor-reactive antibody to more selectively and effectively destroy tumor in vivo. Just as IL-2 can activate lymphocytes to destroy antibody-coated tumor cells, other agents can activate neutrophils and monocytes to destroy antibody-treated tumor cells. We are investigating, in the laboratory and clinic, approaches aimed at eventually using combinations of distinct antibody-based tumor recognition mechanisms in patients whose monocytes, neutrophils, and lymphocytes have been simultaneously activated with multiple biologic agents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)329-335
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Immunotherapy
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

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Neoplasm Antibodies
Immunotherapy
Interleukin-2
Lymphocytes
Monocytes
Neoplasms
Neutrophils
Biological Factors
Clinical Protocols
Monoclonal Antibodies

Keywords

  • Combination immunotherapy
  • Interleukin-2
  • Monoclonal antibody

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Pharmacology
  • Immunology

Cite this

Activation of multiple effector mechanisms to enhance tumor immunotherapy. / Hank, J. A.; Albertini, M. R.; Schiller, J.; Sondel, P. M.

In: Journal of Immunotherapy, Vol. 14, No. 4, 1993, p. 329-335.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hank, J. A. ; Albertini, M. R. ; Schiller, J. ; Sondel, P. M. / Activation of multiple effector mechanisms to enhance tumor immunotherapy. In: Journal of Immunotherapy. 1993 ; Vol. 14, No. 4. pp. 329-335.
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