Acute and longer-term safety results from a pooled analysis of duloxetine studies for the treatment of children and adolescents with major depressive disorder

Graham J. Emslie, Thomas G. Wells, Apurva Prakash, Qi Zhang, Beth A. Pangallo, Mark E. Bangs, John S. March

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To assess acute and longer-term safety of duloxetine in the treatment of children and adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD), a pooled analysis of data from two completed randomized, double-blind, multicenter, phase 3, placebo- and active-controlled trials was undertaken. In these studies, neither duloxetine (investigational drug) nor fluoxetine (active control) demonstrated a statistically significant improvement compared with placebo on the primary efficacy measure. Methods: Patients ages 7-17 years with MDD as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed., Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) received duloxetine (n=341), fluoxetine (n=234), or placebo (n=225) for 10 week acute and 26 week extended (duloxetine or fluoxetine only) treatments. Safety measures included treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs), the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale, vital signs, electrocardiograms, laboratory samples, and growth (height and weight) assessments. Results: Significantly more patients discontinued because of adverse events during duloxetine (8.2%) treatment than during placebo (3.1%) treatment (p≤0.05). TEAEs in >10% of duloxetine-treated patients were headache and nausea. No completed suicides or deaths occurred. During acute treatment, 6.6% of duloxetine-, 8.0% of fluoxetine-, and 8.2% of placebo-treated patients had worsening suicidal ideation from baseline. Among patients initially randomized to duloxetine or fluoxetine who had suicidal ideation at study baseline, 81% of duloxetine- and 77% of fluoxetine-treated patients had improvements in suicidal ideation at end-point in the 36-week studies. Suicidal behavior occurred in two fluoxetine-treated patients and one placebo-treated patient during acute treatment, and in seven duloxetine-treated patients and one fluoxetine-treated patient during extended treatment. Duloxetine-treated patients had a mean pulse increase of ∼3 beats per minute, and mean blood pressure (both systolic and diastolic) increases of <2.0 mm Hg at week 36. Weight decrease (≥3.5%) during acute treatment occurred with statistically (p≤0.05) greater frequency for both the duloxetine (11.4%) and fluoxetine (11.5%) groups versus the placebo (5.5%) group; however, mean weight increase occurred for both duloxetine and fluoxetine groups during extended treatment. Conclusion: Results from this pooled analysis of two studies were consistent with the known safety and tolerability profile of duloxetine. Clinical Trial Registry Numbers: NCT00849901 and NCT00849693.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-305
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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