Acute Kidney Injury in Cirrhosis: Baseline Serum Creatinine Predicts Patient Outcomes

North American Consortium for the Study of End-Stage Liver Disease (NACSELD)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives:The International Ascites Club (IAC) recently defined Stage 1 acute kidney injury (AKI) for cirrhosis as an acute increase in serum creatinine (SCr) by ≥0.3 mg/dl or by ≥50% in <48 h from a stable value within 3 months. The baseline SCr may influence AKI risk and patient outcomes. The objective of this study is to determine in cirrhosis whether the baseline SCr has any effect on the in-hospital AKI course and patient survival.Methods:North American Consortium for the Study of End-Stage Liver Disease is a consortium of tertiary-care hepatology centers prospectively enroling non-elective cirrhotic inpatients. Patients with different baseline SCr levels (≤0.5, 0.51-1.0, 1.01-1.5, >1.5 mg/dl) were evaluated for the development of AKI, and compared for AKI outcomes and 30-day survival.Results:653 hospitalized cirrhotics (56.7±10years, 64% men, 30% with infection) were included. The incidence of AKI was 47% of enrolled patients. Patients with higher baseline SCr were more likely to develop AKI, with significantly higher delta and peak SCr (P<0.001) than the other groups, more likely to have a progressive AKI course (P<0.0001), associated with a significantly reduced 30-day survival (P<0.0001). Multivariate logistic regression showed that the delta SCr during an AKI episode to be the strongest factor impacting AKI outcomes and survival (P<0.001), with a delta SCr of 0.70 mg/dl having a 68% sensitivity and 80% specificity for predicting 30-day mortality.Conclusions:Admitted cirrhotic patients with higher baseline SCr are at higher risk for in-hospital development of AKI, and more likely to have AKI progression with reduced survival. Therefore, such patients should be closely monitored and treated promptly for their AKI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1103-1110
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume112
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Fingerprint

Acute Kidney Injury
Creatinine
Fibrosis
Serum
Survival
Ascites
Logistic Models
Sensitivity and Specificity
Mortality
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

North American Consortium for the Study of End-Stage Liver Disease (NACSELD) (2017). Acute Kidney Injury in Cirrhosis: Baseline Serum Creatinine Predicts Patient Outcomes. American Journal of Gastroenterology, 112(7), 1103-1110. https://doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2017.122

Acute Kidney Injury in Cirrhosis : Baseline Serum Creatinine Predicts Patient Outcomes. / North American Consortium for the Study of End-Stage Liver Disease (NACSELD).

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 112, No. 7, 01.07.2017, p. 1103-1110.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

North American Consortium for the Study of End-Stage Liver Disease (NACSELD) 2017, 'Acute Kidney Injury in Cirrhosis: Baseline Serum Creatinine Predicts Patient Outcomes', American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 112, no. 7, pp. 1103-1110. https://doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2017.122
North American Consortium for the Study of End-Stage Liver Disease (NACSELD). Acute Kidney Injury in Cirrhosis: Baseline Serum Creatinine Predicts Patient Outcomes. American Journal of Gastroenterology. 2017 Jul 1;112(7):1103-1110. https://doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2017.122
North American Consortium for the Study of End-Stage Liver Disease (NACSELD). / Acute Kidney Injury in Cirrhosis : Baseline Serum Creatinine Predicts Patient Outcomes. In: American Journal of Gastroenterology. 2017 ; Vol. 112, No. 7. pp. 1103-1110.
@article{a5b2f39208514c648d6028254038de13,
title = "Acute Kidney Injury in Cirrhosis: Baseline Serum Creatinine Predicts Patient Outcomes",
abstract = "Objectives:The International Ascites Club (IAC) recently defined Stage 1 acute kidney injury (AKI) for cirrhosis as an acute increase in serum creatinine (SCr) by ≥0.3 mg/dl or by ≥50{\%} in <48 h from a stable value within 3 months. The baseline SCr may influence AKI risk and patient outcomes. The objective of this study is to determine in cirrhosis whether the baseline SCr has any effect on the in-hospital AKI course and patient survival.Methods:North American Consortium for the Study of End-Stage Liver Disease is a consortium of tertiary-care hepatology centers prospectively enroling non-elective cirrhotic inpatients. Patients with different baseline SCr levels (≤0.5, 0.51-1.0, 1.01-1.5, >1.5 mg/dl) were evaluated for the development of AKI, and compared for AKI outcomes and 30-day survival.Results:653 hospitalized cirrhotics (56.7±10years, 64{\%} men, 30{\%} with infection) were included. The incidence of AKI was 47{\%} of enrolled patients. Patients with higher baseline SCr were more likely to develop AKI, with significantly higher delta and peak SCr (P<0.001) than the other groups, more likely to have a progressive AKI course (P<0.0001), associated with a significantly reduced 30-day survival (P<0.0001). Multivariate logistic regression showed that the delta SCr during an AKI episode to be the strongest factor impacting AKI outcomes and survival (P<0.001), with a delta SCr of 0.70 mg/dl having a 68{\%} sensitivity and 80{\%} specificity for predicting 30-day mortality.Conclusions:Admitted cirrhotic patients with higher baseline SCr are at higher risk for in-hospital development of AKI, and more likely to have AKI progression with reduced survival. Therefore, such patients should be closely monitored and treated promptly for their AKI.",
author = "{North American Consortium for the Study of End-Stage Liver Disease (NACSELD)} and F. Wong and O'Leary, {J. G.} and Reddy, {K. R.} and G. Garcia-Tsao and Fallon, {M. B.} and Biggins, {S. W.} and Subramanian, {R. M.} and Thuluvath, {P. J.} and Kamath, {P. S.} and H. Patton and B. Maliakkal and P. Tandon and H. Vargas and L. Thacker and Bajaj, {J. S.}",
year = "2017",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/ajg.2017.122",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "112",
pages = "1103--1110",
journal = "American Journal of Gastroenterology",
issn = "0002-9270",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acute Kidney Injury in Cirrhosis

T2 - Baseline Serum Creatinine Predicts Patient Outcomes

AU - North American Consortium for the Study of End-Stage Liver Disease (NACSELD)

AU - Wong, F.

AU - O'Leary, J. G.

AU - Reddy, K. R.

AU - Garcia-Tsao, G.

AU - Fallon, M. B.

AU - Biggins, S. W.

AU - Subramanian, R. M.

AU - Thuluvath, P. J.

AU - Kamath, P. S.

AU - Patton, H.

AU - Maliakkal, B.

AU - Tandon, P.

AU - Vargas, H.

AU - Thacker, L.

AU - Bajaj, J. S.

PY - 2017/7/1

Y1 - 2017/7/1

N2 - Objectives:The International Ascites Club (IAC) recently defined Stage 1 acute kidney injury (AKI) for cirrhosis as an acute increase in serum creatinine (SCr) by ≥0.3 mg/dl or by ≥50% in <48 h from a stable value within 3 months. The baseline SCr may influence AKI risk and patient outcomes. The objective of this study is to determine in cirrhosis whether the baseline SCr has any effect on the in-hospital AKI course and patient survival.Methods:North American Consortium for the Study of End-Stage Liver Disease is a consortium of tertiary-care hepatology centers prospectively enroling non-elective cirrhotic inpatients. Patients with different baseline SCr levels (≤0.5, 0.51-1.0, 1.01-1.5, >1.5 mg/dl) were evaluated for the development of AKI, and compared for AKI outcomes and 30-day survival.Results:653 hospitalized cirrhotics (56.7±10years, 64% men, 30% with infection) were included. The incidence of AKI was 47% of enrolled patients. Patients with higher baseline SCr were more likely to develop AKI, with significantly higher delta and peak SCr (P<0.001) than the other groups, more likely to have a progressive AKI course (P<0.0001), associated with a significantly reduced 30-day survival (P<0.0001). Multivariate logistic regression showed that the delta SCr during an AKI episode to be the strongest factor impacting AKI outcomes and survival (P<0.001), with a delta SCr of 0.70 mg/dl having a 68% sensitivity and 80% specificity for predicting 30-day mortality.Conclusions:Admitted cirrhotic patients with higher baseline SCr are at higher risk for in-hospital development of AKI, and more likely to have AKI progression with reduced survival. Therefore, such patients should be closely monitored and treated promptly for their AKI.

AB - Objectives:The International Ascites Club (IAC) recently defined Stage 1 acute kidney injury (AKI) for cirrhosis as an acute increase in serum creatinine (SCr) by ≥0.3 mg/dl or by ≥50% in <48 h from a stable value within 3 months. The baseline SCr may influence AKI risk and patient outcomes. The objective of this study is to determine in cirrhosis whether the baseline SCr has any effect on the in-hospital AKI course and patient survival.Methods:North American Consortium for the Study of End-Stage Liver Disease is a consortium of tertiary-care hepatology centers prospectively enroling non-elective cirrhotic inpatients. Patients with different baseline SCr levels (≤0.5, 0.51-1.0, 1.01-1.5, >1.5 mg/dl) were evaluated for the development of AKI, and compared for AKI outcomes and 30-day survival.Results:653 hospitalized cirrhotics (56.7±10years, 64% men, 30% with infection) were included. The incidence of AKI was 47% of enrolled patients. Patients with higher baseline SCr were more likely to develop AKI, with significantly higher delta and peak SCr (P<0.001) than the other groups, more likely to have a progressive AKI course (P<0.0001), associated with a significantly reduced 30-day survival (P<0.0001). Multivariate logistic regression showed that the delta SCr during an AKI episode to be the strongest factor impacting AKI outcomes and survival (P<0.001), with a delta SCr of 0.70 mg/dl having a 68% sensitivity and 80% specificity for predicting 30-day mortality.Conclusions:Admitted cirrhotic patients with higher baseline SCr are at higher risk for in-hospital development of AKI, and more likely to have AKI progression with reduced survival. Therefore, such patients should be closely monitored and treated promptly for their AKI.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85025682378&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85025682378&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/ajg.2017.122

DO - 10.1038/ajg.2017.122

M3 - Article

C2 - 28440305

AN - SCOPUS:85025682378

VL - 112

SP - 1103

EP - 1110

JO - American Journal of Gastroenterology

JF - American Journal of Gastroenterology

SN - 0002-9270

IS - 7

ER -