Acute on chronic gastrointestinal bleeding: A unique clinical entity

Don C. Rockey, Adam C. Hafemeister, Joan S. Reisch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Gastrointestinal bleeding is defined in temporal-spatial terms-as acute or chronic, and/or by its location in the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we define a distinct type of bleeding, which we have coined â € acute on chronic' gastrointestinal bleeding. We prospectively identified all patients who underwent endoscopic evaluation for any form of gastrointestinal bleeding at a University Hospital. Acute on chronic bleeding was defined as the presence of new symptoms or signs of acute bleeding in the setting of chronic bleeding, documented as iron deficiency anemia. Bleeding lesions were categorized using previously established criteria. We identified a total of 776, 254, and 430 patients with acute, chronic, or acute on chronic bleeding, respectively. In patients with acute on chronic gastrointestinal bleeding, lesions were most commonly identified in esophagus (28%), colon and rectum (27%), and stomach (21%) (p<0.0001 vs locations for acute or chronic bleeding). In those specifically with acute on chronic upper gastrointestinal bleeding (n=260), bleeding was most commonly due to portal hypertensive lesions, identified in 47% of subjects compared with 29% of acute and 25% of chronic bleeders, (p<0.001). In all patients with acute on chronic bleeding, 30-day mortality was less than that after acute bleeding alone (2% (10/430) vs 7% (54/776), respectively, p<0.001). Acute on chronic gastrointestinal bleeding is common, and in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding was most often a result of portal hypertensive upper gastrointestinal tract pathology. Reduced mortality in patients with acute on chronic gastrointestinal bleeding compared with those with acute bleeding raises the possibility of an adaptive response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)892-898
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Investigative Medicine
Volume65
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Fingerprint

Hemorrhage
Pathology
Iron
Upper Gastrointestinal Tract
Iron-Deficiency Anemias
Mortality
Rectum
Esophagus
Signs and Symptoms
Gastrointestinal Tract
Stomach
Colon

Keywords

  • Endoscopy
  • Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage
  • Peptic Ulcer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Acute on chronic gastrointestinal bleeding : A unique clinical entity. / Rockey, Don C.; Hafemeister, Adam C.; Reisch, Joan S.

In: Journal of Investigative Medicine, Vol. 65, No. 5, 01.06.2017, p. 892-898.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rockey, Don C. ; Hafemeister, Adam C. ; Reisch, Joan S. / Acute on chronic gastrointestinal bleeding : A unique clinical entity. In: Journal of Investigative Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 65, No. 5. pp. 892-898.
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