Adaptation of respiratory muscle perfusion during exercise to chronically elevated ventilatory work

C. C W Hsia, S. I. Takeda, E. Y. Wu, R. W. Glenny, Jr Johnson R.L.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pneumonectomy (PNX) leads to chronic asymmetric ventilatory loading of respiratory muscles (RM). We measured RM energy requirements during exercise from RM blood flow (Q) using a fluorescent microsphere technique in dogs that had undergone right PNX as adults (adult R-PNX) or as puppies (puppy R-PNX), compared with dogs subjected to right thoracotomy without PNX as puppies (Sham) and to left PNX as adults (adult L-PNX). Ventilatory work (W) was measured during exercise. RM weight was determined post mortem. After adult and puppy R-PNX, the right hemidiaphragm becomes grossly distorted, but W and right costal muscle mass increased only after adult R-PNX. After adult L-PNX, the diaphragm was undistorted; W and left hemidiaphragm RM Q were elevated, but muscle mass did not increase. Mass of parasternal muscle did not increase after adult R-PNX, despite increased Q. Thus muscle mass increased only in response to the combination of chronic stretch and dynamic loading. There was a dorsal-to-ventral gradient of increasing Q within the diaphragm, but the distribution was unaffected by anatomic distortion, hypertrophy, or workload, suggesting a fixed pattern of neural activation. The diaphragm and parasternals were the primary muscles compensating for the asymmetric loading from PNX.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1725-1736
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume89
Issue number5
StatePublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Respiratory Muscles
Perfusion
Muscles
Diaphragm
Dogs
Pneumonectomy
Thoracotomy
Workload
Microspheres
Hypertrophy
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Diaphragm
  • Dog
  • Microspheres
  • Pneumonectomy
  • Work of breathing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Endocrinology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Adaptation of respiratory muscle perfusion during exercise to chronically elevated ventilatory work. / Hsia, C. C W; Takeda, S. I.; Wu, E. Y.; Glenny, R. W.; Johnson R.L., Jr.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 89, No. 5, 2000, p. 1725-1736.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hsia, CCW, Takeda, SI, Wu, EY, Glenny, RW & Johnson R.L., J 2000, 'Adaptation of respiratory muscle perfusion during exercise to chronically elevated ventilatory work', Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 89, no. 5, pp. 1725-1736.
Hsia, C. C W ; Takeda, S. I. ; Wu, E. Y. ; Glenny, R. W. ; Johnson R.L., Jr. / Adaptation of respiratory muscle perfusion during exercise to chronically elevated ventilatory work. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 2000 ; Vol. 89, No. 5. pp. 1725-1736.
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