Adaptive Prediction for Social Contexts: The Cerebellar Contribution to Typical and Atypical Social Behaviors

Catherine J. Stoodley, Peter T. Tsai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Social interactions involve processes ranging from face recognition to understanding others rsquo intentions. To guide appropriate behavior in a given context, social interactions rely on accurately predicting the outcomes of one's actions and the thoughts of others. Because social interactions are inherently dynamic, these predictions must be continuously adapted. The neural correlates of social processing have largely focused on emotion, mentalizing, and reward networks, without integration of systems involved in prediction. The cerebellum forms predictive models to calibrate movements and adapt them to changing situations, and cerebellar predictive modeling is thought to extend to nonmotor behaviors. Primary cerebellar dysfunction can produce social deficits, and atypical cerebellar structure and function are reported in autism, which is characterized by social communication challenges and atypical predictive processing. We examine the evidence that cerebellar-mediated predictions and adaptation play important roles in social processes and argue that disruptions in these processes contribute to autism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)475-493
Number of pages19
JournalAnnual Review of Neuroscience
Volume44
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 8 2021

Keywords

  • adaptation
  • autism
  • cerebellum
  • implicit
  • prediction
  • social

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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