Adults with well-healed burn injuries have lower pulmonary function values decades after injury

Joseph C. Watso, Steven A. Romero, Gilbert Moralez, Mu Huang, Matthew N. Cramer, Manall F. Jaffery, Bryce N. Balmain, Daniel P. Wilhite, Tony G. Babb, Craig G. Crandall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Sub-acute (e.g., inhalation injury) and/or acute insults sustained during a severe burn injury impairs pulmonary function. However, previous work has not fully characterized pulmonary function in adults with well-healed burn injuries decades after an injury. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that adults with well-healed burn injuries have lower pulmonary function years after recovery. Our cohort of adults with well-healed burn-injuries (n = 41) had a lower forced expiratory volume in one second (Burn: 93 ± 16 vs. Control: 103 ± 10%predicted, mean ± SD; d = 0.60, p = 0.04), lower maximal voluntary ventilation (Burn: 84 [71–97] vs. Control: 105 [94–122] %predicted, median [IQR]; d = 0.84, p < 0.01), and a higher specific airway resistance (Burn: 235 ± 80 vs. Control: 179 ± 40%predicted, mean ± SD; d = 0.66, p = 0.02) than non-burned control participants (n = 12). No variables were meaningfully influenced by having a previous inhalation injury (d ≤ 0.44, p ≥ 0.19; 13 of 41 had an inhalation injury), the size of the body surface area burned (R2 ≤ 0.06, p ≥ 0.15; range of 15%–88% body surface area burned), or the time since the burn injury (R2 ≤ 0.04, p ≥ 0.22; range of 2–50 years post-injury). These data suggest that adults with well-healed burn injuries have lower pulmonary function decades after injury. Therefore, future research should examine rehabilitation strategies that could improve pulmonary function among adults with well-healed burn injuries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere15264
JournalPhysiological Reports
Volume10
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2022

Keywords

  • body surface area
  • inhalation injury
  • lung diffusing capacity
  • lung volumes
  • spirometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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