Aggression, impulsivity, and health functioning in a veteran population: equivalency and test-retest reliability of computerized and paper-and-pencil administrations

Alina Surís, Patricia D. Borman, Lisa Lind, T. Michael Kashner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study examined the equivalency and test-retest reliability of two administration methods (paper-and-pencil and computerized) of the Aggression Questionnaire (AQ), Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 (BIS-11), and SF-36 Health Survey (SF-36) in a sample of 97 veterans. The two-week test-retest reliability for the conventional paper-and-pencil administrations of the AQ, BIS-11, and the SF-36 in the veteran population were generally reliable and comparable to the test-retest reliability of these measures noted in the research for other populations. Equivalence of the computer vs. paper-and-pencil administrations were examined and results indicated that for the AQ, ICCs for all four subscales and total score were substantially lower for the PC administration. For the BIS-11, ICCs were comparable with the exception of the Motor subscale, which was lower in the PC condition. For the SF-36, two of the domains were higher in the PC condition, with four more being comparable. Overall, the computerized administration of the BIS-11 and SF-36 was found to be equivalent to the "gold standard" paper-and-pencil administration of these measures and can be utilized successfully among veterans. The computerized administration of the AQ, however, was not found to be equivalent to the paper-and-pencil administration of the measure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-110
Number of pages14
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2007

Fingerprint

Impulsive Behavior
Veterans
Aggression
Reproducibility of Results
Health
Population
Health Surveys
Surveys and Questionnaires
Impulsivity
Pencil
Test-retest Reliability
Equivalency
Research
Questionnaire

Keywords

  • Aggression
  • Assessment
  • Computers
  • Impulsivity
  • Physical health
  • Veterans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Aggression, impulsivity, and health functioning in a veteran population : equivalency and test-retest reliability of computerized and paper-and-pencil administrations. / Surís, Alina; Borman, Patricia D.; Lind, Lisa; Kashner, T. Michael.

In: Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 23, No. 1, 01.2007, p. 97-110.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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