Ambulatory Anesthesia and Regional Catheters

When and How

Jeffrey D. Swenson, Gloria S. Cheng, Deborah A. Axelrod, Jennifer J. Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several clinical trials have demonstrated the superiority of continuous peripheral nerve block compared with traditional opioid-based analgesia. The ability to provide safe and effective continuous peripheral nerve block at home is an attractive alternative to opioid-based analgesia with its related side effects. In this article, the practical issues related to catheter use in the ambulatory setting are discussed. Techniques for catheter placement, infusion regimens, patient education, and complications are subject to many institutional preferences. In this review, special emphasis is placed on evidence-based techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-280
Number of pages14
JournalAnesthesiology Clinics
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010

Fingerprint

Conduction Anesthesia
Nerve Block
Peripheral Nerves
Analgesia
Opioid Analgesics
Catheters
Patient Education
Clinical Trials

Keywords

  • Ambulatory anesthesia
  • Continuous peripheral nerve block
  • Peripheral catheters

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Ambulatory Anesthesia and Regional Catheters : When and How. / Swenson, Jeffrey D.; Cheng, Gloria S.; Axelrod, Deborah A.; Davis, Jennifer J.

In: Anesthesiology Clinics, Vol. 28, No. 2, 06.2010, p. 267-280.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Swenson, Jeffrey D. ; Cheng, Gloria S. ; Axelrod, Deborah A. ; Davis, Jennifer J. / Ambulatory Anesthesia and Regional Catheters : When and How. In: Anesthesiology Clinics. 2010 ; Vol. 28, No. 2. pp. 267-280.
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