Amyloid deposition in younger adults is linked to episodic memory performance

Gérard N. Bischof, Karen M. Rodrigue, Kristen M. Kennedy, Michael D. Devous, Denise C. Park

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Abstract

Objective: To examine the relationship of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposition to episodic memory in younger (30-49 years), middle-older (50-69 years), and older adults (70-89 years). We hypothesized that subclinical levels of amyloid would be linked to memory in adults across the lifespan in a dose-dependent fashion. Of great interest was whether, within the younger group, a relationship between amyloid level and memory performance could be established. Methods: A total of 147 participants from the Dallas Lifespan Brain Study, aged 30-89, underwent PET imaging with 18 F-florbetapir and cognitive assessment. We assessed the relationship between age group and amyloid and tested whether Aβ differentially affected memory performance across the 3 age groups. Results: We report a significant association of age to amyloid burden for younger and middle-older adults (r = 0.57 and 0.28, respectively), but not for the oldest group, although absolute level of amyloid increased across the age groups. Importantly, the youngest group showed a significant decrease in recall (r = -0.47, p = 0.004) and recognition memory (r = -0.48, p = 0.003) as a function of increases in Aβ burden, whereas this relationship was absent in the middle-older and oldest group (all p > 0.23). Conclusions: These results indicate that variance in subclinical levels of Aβ in younger adults is meaningful, and suggest that higher SUVRs relative to one's peers at a younger age is not entirely benign.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2562-2566
Number of pages5
JournalNeurology
Volume87
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 13 2016

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Episodic Memory
Amyloid
Young Adult
Age Groups
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Bischof, G. N., Rodrigue, K. M., Kennedy, K. M., Devous, M. D., & Park, D. C. (2016). Amyloid deposition in younger adults is linked to episodic memory performance. Neurology, 87(24), 2562-2566. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000003425

Amyloid deposition in younger adults is linked to episodic memory performance. / Bischof, Gérard N.; Rodrigue, Karen M.; Kennedy, Kristen M.; Devous, Michael D.; Park, Denise C.

In: Neurology, Vol. 87, No. 24, 13.12.2016, p. 2562-2566.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bischof, GN, Rodrigue, KM, Kennedy, KM, Devous, MD & Park, DC 2016, 'Amyloid deposition in younger adults is linked to episodic memory performance', Neurology, vol. 87, no. 24, pp. 2562-2566. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000003425
Bischof GN, Rodrigue KM, Kennedy KM, Devous MD, Park DC. Amyloid deposition in younger adults is linked to episodic memory performance. Neurology. 2016 Dec 13;87(24):2562-2566. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000003425
Bischof, Gérard N. ; Rodrigue, Karen M. ; Kennedy, Kristen M. ; Devous, Michael D. ; Park, Denise C. / Amyloid deposition in younger adults is linked to episodic memory performance. In: Neurology. 2016 ; Vol. 87, No. 24. pp. 2562-2566.
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