Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and organ donation

Is there risk of disease transmission?

Brandon B. Holmes, Marc I. Diamond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A new protocol suggests that patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are a viable source of tissue for organ transplantation. However, multiple lines of evidence suggest that many neurodegenerative diseases, including ALS, might progress due to transcellular propagation of protein aggregation among neurons. Transmission of the disease state from donor to host thus may be possible under the permissive circumstances of graft transplantation. We argue for careful patient selection and close longitudinal follow-up of recipients when harvesting organs from individuals with neurodegenerative disease, especially dominantly inherited forms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)832-836
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of Neurology
Volume72
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012

Fingerprint

Tissue and Organ Procurement
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Tissue and Organ Harvesting
Tissue Transplantation
Organ Transplantation
Patient Selection
Transplantation
Tissue Donors
Transplants
Neurons
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and organ donation : Is there risk of disease transmission? / Holmes, Brandon B.; Diamond, Marc I.

In: Annals of Neurology, Vol. 72, No. 6, 12.2012, p. 832-836.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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