An assessment of the onset and duration of action of olopatadine nasal spray

Piyush Patel, Peter S. Roland, Bradley F. Marple, Paul J. Benninger, Harriet Margalias, Michael Brubaker, Susan F. Beezley, Margaret Drake, Susan L. Potts, G. Michael Wall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR) is a highly prevalent disease. This study was conducted to evaluate the onset and duration of action of three concentrations of olopatadine nasal spray. Methods: This was a randomized, double-blind, single-dose, placebo-controlled study, conducted in an environmental exposure chamber in patients with SAR. A total of 320 patients were exposed to ragweed allergen in the chamber and randomized to olopatadine nasal spray 0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6%, or placebo nasal spray. Symptoms (sneezing, runny, itchy, and stuffy nose) were self-assessed during a 12-hour study period. Results: All concentrations of olopatadine nasal spray provided clinically meaningful reductions in total nasal symptom scores at 30 minutes compared to the placebo. Olopatadine nasal spray 0.6% was significantly more effective (P < 0.05) than placebo nasal spray at all time-points starting at 90 minutes post-dose and continuing over 12 hours. Conclusions: Olopatadine nasal spray 0.6% demonstrated a fast onset of action and maintained an effect for at least 12 hours after dosing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)918-924
Number of pages7
JournalOtolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume137
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2007

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Nasal Sprays
Placebos
Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis
Nose
Sneezing
Ambrosia
Environmental Exposure
Olopatadine Hydrochloride
Allergens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Patel, P., Roland, P. S., Marple, B. F., Benninger, P. J., Margalias, H., Brubaker, M., ... Wall, G. M. (2007). An assessment of the onset and duration of action of olopatadine nasal spray. Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, 137(6), 918-924. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.otohns.2007.08.005

An assessment of the onset and duration of action of olopatadine nasal spray. / Patel, Piyush; Roland, Peter S.; Marple, Bradley F.; Benninger, Paul J.; Margalias, Harriet; Brubaker, Michael; Beezley, Susan F.; Drake, Margaret; Potts, Susan L.; Wall, G. Michael.

In: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 137, No. 6, 12.2007, p. 918-924.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patel, P, Roland, PS, Marple, BF, Benninger, PJ, Margalias, H, Brubaker, M, Beezley, SF, Drake, M, Potts, SL & Wall, GM 2007, 'An assessment of the onset and duration of action of olopatadine nasal spray', Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, vol. 137, no. 6, pp. 918-924. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.otohns.2007.08.005
Patel, Piyush ; Roland, Peter S. ; Marple, Bradley F. ; Benninger, Paul J. ; Margalias, Harriet ; Brubaker, Michael ; Beezley, Susan F. ; Drake, Margaret ; Potts, Susan L. ; Wall, G. Michael. / An assessment of the onset and duration of action of olopatadine nasal spray. In: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. 2007 ; Vol. 137, No. 6. pp. 918-924.
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