An empirical study of alcohol consumption by patients considering HCV treatment

Carol S North, Omar Sims, Barry A. Hong, Mamta Jain, Geri Brown, Mauricio Lisker-Melman, David E. Pollio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Alcohol accelerates the course of hepatitis C (HCV) infection and liver damage. Little is known about recency of alcohol use among patients with HCV. Objectives: Alcohol consumption recency was compared among HCV patients with and without alcohol use disorders and current and lifetime alcohol use histories. Methods: Patients considering antiviral treatment for HCV (n=309) recruited from university-affiliated and VA liver and infectious disease clinics were assessed for lifetime and current-year psychiatric disorders and alcohol-use patterns. Full diagnostic interviews, self-report surveys, medical record review, and urine screening for recent alcohol and drug use were conducted. Results: 60% used alcohol in the last year. Besides alcohol history, those who stopped using alcohol in the past year differed from those with no lifetime use only in gender (60% vs. 22%); however, patients no longer using alcohol in the last year were less likely than those still using to have a current drug use disorder (16% vs. 3%) or last-month drug use (52% vs. 30%), and had fewer current risky behaviors (1.3 vs. 0.6). Among patients with last-year alcohol use, those with past alcohol use disorders differed from those without only by higher prevalence of drug use disorder (84% vs. 47%) and drug use after HCV diagnosis (67% vs. 43%). Conclusions: Patients who had stopped using alcohol for at least a year were much like those who never used alcohol in regard to other drug use, psychiatric history, smoking, and risky behaviors. These findings indicate that HCV patients with at least a year of abstinence from alcohol, including those with a history of alcohol use disorder, should be considered HCV treatment candidates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)484-489
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
Volume40
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

Fingerprint

Alcohol Drinking
Alcohols
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Substance-Related Disorders
Psychiatry
Alcohol Abstinence
Hepatitis C
Self Report
Medical Records
Antiviral Agents
Communicable Diseases
Liver Diseases
Smoking
History
Urine

Keywords

  • Alcohol consumption patterns
  • Alcohol use disorder
  • Drug use
  • Hepatitis C
  • Liver damage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

An empirical study of alcohol consumption by patients considering HCV treatment. / North, Carol S; Sims, Omar; Hong, Barry A.; Jain, Mamta; Brown, Geri; Lisker-Melman, Mauricio; Pollio, David E.

In: American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, Vol. 40, No. 6, 01.11.2014, p. 484-489.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

North, Carol S ; Sims, Omar ; Hong, Barry A. ; Jain, Mamta ; Brown, Geri ; Lisker-Melman, Mauricio ; Pollio, David E. / An empirical study of alcohol consumption by patients considering HCV treatment. In: American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse. 2014 ; Vol. 40, No. 6. pp. 484-489.
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abstract = "Background: Alcohol accelerates the course of hepatitis C (HCV) infection and liver damage. Little is known about recency of alcohol use among patients with HCV. Objectives: Alcohol consumption recency was compared among HCV patients with and without alcohol use disorders and current and lifetime alcohol use histories. Methods: Patients considering antiviral treatment for HCV (n=309) recruited from university-affiliated and VA liver and infectious disease clinics were assessed for lifetime and current-year psychiatric disorders and alcohol-use patterns. Full diagnostic interviews, self-report surveys, medical record review, and urine screening for recent alcohol and drug use were conducted. Results: 60{\%} used alcohol in the last year. Besides alcohol history, those who stopped using alcohol in the past year differed from those with no lifetime use only in gender (60{\%} vs. 22{\%}); however, patients no longer using alcohol in the last year were less likely than those still using to have a current drug use disorder (16{\%} vs. 3{\%}) or last-month drug use (52{\%} vs. 30{\%}), and had fewer current risky behaviors (1.3 vs. 0.6). Among patients with last-year alcohol use, those with past alcohol use disorders differed from those without only by higher prevalence of drug use disorder (84{\%} vs. 47{\%}) and drug use after HCV diagnosis (67{\%} vs. 43{\%}). Conclusions: Patients who had stopped using alcohol for at least a year were much like those who never used alcohol in regard to other drug use, psychiatric history, smoking, and risky behaviors. These findings indicate that HCV patients with at least a year of abstinence from alcohol, including those with a history of alcohol use disorder, should be considered HCV treatment candidates.",
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