An Examination of the Impact of Racial and Ethnic Identity, Impostor Feelings, and Minority Status Stress on the Mental Health of Black College Students

Shannon McClain, Samuel T. Beasley, Bianca Jones, Olufunke Awosogba, Stacey Jackson, Kevin Cokley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined ethnic identity, racial centrality, minority status stress, and impostor feelings as predictors of mental health in a sample of 218 Black college students. Ethnic identity was found to be a significant positive predictor of mental health, whereas minority status stress and impostor feelings were significant negative predictors. Although ethnic identity was the strongest predictor of mental health, racial centrality represented a nonsignificant, negative predictor. Counseling implications for Black college students are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)101-117
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Multicultural Counseling and Development
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

Keywords

  • impostor phenomenon
  • minority status stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Applied Psychology

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