Anatomical and functional characteristics of carotid sinus stimulation in humans

R. G. Querry, S. A. Smith, M. Strømstad, K. Ide, N. H. Secher, P. B. Raven

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Transmission characteristics of pneumatic pressure to the carotid sinus were evaluated in 19 subjects at rest and during exercise. Either a percutaneous fluid-filled (n = 12) or balloon-tipped catheter (n = 7) was placed at the carotid bifurcation to record internal transmission of external neck pressure/neck suction (NP/NS). Sustained, 5-s pulses, and rapid ramping pulse protocols (+40 to -80 Torr) were recorded. Transmission of pressure stimuli was less with the fluid-filled catheter compared with that of the balloon-tipped catheter (65% vs. 82% negative pressure, 83% vs. 89% positive pressure; P < 0.05). Anatomical location of the carotid sinus averaged 3.2 cm (left) and 3.6 cm (right) from the gonion of the mandible with a range of 0-7.5 cm. Transmission was not altered by exercise or Valsalva maneuver, but did vary depending on the position of the carotid sinus locus beneath the sealed chamber. These data indicate that transmission of external NP/NS was higher than previously recorded in humans, and anatomical variation of carotid sinus location and equipment design can affect transmission results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume280
Issue number5 49-5
StatePublished - May 2001

Fingerprint

Carotid Sinus
Pressure
Neck
Catheters
Suction
Equipment Design
Valsalva Maneuver
Mandible
Pulse

Keywords

  • Carotid baroreflex
  • Chamber pressure
  • Tissue pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Anatomical and functional characteristics of carotid sinus stimulation in humans. / Querry, R. G.; Smith, S. A.; Strømstad, M.; Ide, K.; Secher, N. H.; Raven, P. B.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, Vol. 280, No. 5 49-5, 05.2001.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f34dec8f148a4cb8b8fd1d0ee431fddf,
title = "Anatomical and functional characteristics of carotid sinus stimulation in humans",
abstract = "Transmission characteristics of pneumatic pressure to the carotid sinus were evaluated in 19 subjects at rest and during exercise. Either a percutaneous fluid-filled (n = 12) or balloon-tipped catheter (n = 7) was placed at the carotid bifurcation to record internal transmission of external neck pressure/neck suction (NP/NS). Sustained, 5-s pulses, and rapid ramping pulse protocols (+40 to -80 Torr) were recorded. Transmission of pressure stimuli was less with the fluid-filled catheter compared with that of the balloon-tipped catheter (65{\%} vs. 82{\%} negative pressure, 83{\%} vs. 89{\%} positive pressure; P < 0.05). Anatomical location of the carotid sinus averaged 3.2 cm (left) and 3.6 cm (right) from the gonion of the mandible with a range of 0-7.5 cm. Transmission was not altered by exercise or Valsalva maneuver, but did vary depending on the position of the carotid sinus locus beneath the sealed chamber. These data indicate that transmission of external NP/NS was higher than previously recorded in humans, and anatomical variation of carotid sinus location and equipment design can affect transmission results.",
keywords = "Carotid baroreflex, Chamber pressure, Tissue pressure",
author = "Querry, {R. G.} and Smith, {S. A.} and M. Str{\o}mstad and K. Ide and Secher, {N. H.} and Raven, {P. B.}",
year = "2001",
month = "5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "280",
journal = "American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology",
issn = "0363-6135",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "5 49-5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Anatomical and functional characteristics of carotid sinus stimulation in humans

AU - Querry, R. G.

AU - Smith, S. A.

AU - Strømstad, M.

AU - Ide, K.

AU - Secher, N. H.

AU - Raven, P. B.

PY - 2001/5

Y1 - 2001/5

N2 - Transmission characteristics of pneumatic pressure to the carotid sinus were evaluated in 19 subjects at rest and during exercise. Either a percutaneous fluid-filled (n = 12) or balloon-tipped catheter (n = 7) was placed at the carotid bifurcation to record internal transmission of external neck pressure/neck suction (NP/NS). Sustained, 5-s pulses, and rapid ramping pulse protocols (+40 to -80 Torr) were recorded. Transmission of pressure stimuli was less with the fluid-filled catheter compared with that of the balloon-tipped catheter (65% vs. 82% negative pressure, 83% vs. 89% positive pressure; P < 0.05). Anatomical location of the carotid sinus averaged 3.2 cm (left) and 3.6 cm (right) from the gonion of the mandible with a range of 0-7.5 cm. Transmission was not altered by exercise or Valsalva maneuver, but did vary depending on the position of the carotid sinus locus beneath the sealed chamber. These data indicate that transmission of external NP/NS was higher than previously recorded in humans, and anatomical variation of carotid sinus location and equipment design can affect transmission results.

AB - Transmission characteristics of pneumatic pressure to the carotid sinus were evaluated in 19 subjects at rest and during exercise. Either a percutaneous fluid-filled (n = 12) or balloon-tipped catheter (n = 7) was placed at the carotid bifurcation to record internal transmission of external neck pressure/neck suction (NP/NS). Sustained, 5-s pulses, and rapid ramping pulse protocols (+40 to -80 Torr) were recorded. Transmission of pressure stimuli was less with the fluid-filled catheter compared with that of the balloon-tipped catheter (65% vs. 82% negative pressure, 83% vs. 89% positive pressure; P < 0.05). Anatomical location of the carotid sinus averaged 3.2 cm (left) and 3.6 cm (right) from the gonion of the mandible with a range of 0-7.5 cm. Transmission was not altered by exercise or Valsalva maneuver, but did vary depending on the position of the carotid sinus locus beneath the sealed chamber. These data indicate that transmission of external NP/NS was higher than previously recorded in humans, and anatomical variation of carotid sinus location and equipment design can affect transmission results.

KW - Carotid baroreflex

KW - Chamber pressure

KW - Tissue pressure

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035026708&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035026708&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 280

JO - American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology

JF - American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology

SN - 0363-6135

IS - 5 49-5

ER -