Anti-Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Neutralizing Antibody Decreases Lung Inflammation, Airway Obstruction, and Airway Hyperresponsiveness in a Murine RSV Model

Asunción Mejías, Susana Chávez-Bueno, Ana María Ríos, Jesús Saavedra-Lozano, Mónica Fonseca Aten, Jeanine Hatfield, Payal Kapur, Ana María Gómez, Hasan S. Jafri, Octavio Ramilo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Scopus citations

Abstract

Numerous studies have described a strong association between respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in infancy and the development of recurrent wheezing and airway hyperresponsiveness. We evaluated the effect of an anti-RSV neutralizing monoclonal antibody (palivizumab) on different aspects of RSV disease by using a murine model. BALB/c mice were intranasally inoculated with RSV A2. Palivizumab or an isotype-matched control antibody was administered once at 24 h before inoculation, 1 h after inoculation, or 48 h after inoculation. Regardless of the timing of administration, all mice treated with the neutralizing antibody showed significantly decreased RSV loads in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung specimens compared with those of infected controls. Pulmonary histopathologic scores, airway obstruction measured by plethysmography, and airway hyperresponsiveness after methacholine challenge were significantly reduced in mice treated with the anti-RSV antibody 24 h before inoculation compared with those for untreated controls. Concentrations of interferon-gamma, interleukin-10, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α, regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), and eotaxin in BAL fluids were also significantly reduced in mice treated with palivizumab 24 h before inoculation. This study demonstrates that reduced RSV replication was associated with significant modulation of inflammatory and clinical markers of acute disease severity and significant improvement of the long-term pulmonary abnormalities. Studies to determine whether strategies aimed at preventing or reducing RSV replication could decrease the long-term morbidity associated with RSV infection in children should be considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1811-1822
Number of pages12
JournalAntimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
Volume48
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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