Appetite control in C. elegans

Kristen Davis, Mi Cheong Cheong, Ji Su Park, Young Jai You

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Caenorhabditis elegans is a 1-mm-long free-living nematode that feeds on bacteria. The feeding organ of C. elegans is a pharynx, a neuromuscular tube responsible for sucking bacteria into the worm from outside, concentrating them, and grinding them up (Doncaster 1962, Seymour et al. 1983). The basic mechanics and the neurons and muscles used to execute feeding motion are important for understanding several feeding behaviors and are therefore briefly described. More details regarding cellular and nuclear composition, the structure, electrophysiology, and the molecular components can be found in Avery and You (2012).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAppetite and Food Intake
Subtitle of host publicationCentral Control, Second Edition
PublisherCRC Press
Pages1-16
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9781498723176
ISBN (Print)9781498723169
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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    Davis, K., Cheong, M. C., Park, J. S., & You, Y. J. (2017). Appetite control in C. elegans. In Appetite and Food Intake: Central Control, Second Edition (pp. 1-16). CRC Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/9781315120171