Application of FPGA technology to performance limitations in radiation therapy

J. J. DeMarco, J. B. Smathers, Tim D. Solberg, Steve Casselman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The field programmable gate array (FPGA) is a promising technology for increasing computation performance by providing for the design of custom chips through programmable logic blocks. This technology was used to implement and test a hardware random number generator (RNG) versus four software algorithms. The custom hardware consists of a sun SBus-based board (EVC) which has been designed around a Xilinx FPGA. A timing analysis indicates the Sun/EVC hardware generator computes 1 multiplied by 10 6 random numbers approximately 50 times faster than the multiplicative congruential algorithm. The hardware and software RNGs were also compare using a Monte Carlo photon transport algorithm. For this comparison the Sun/EVC generator produces a performance increase of approximately 2.0 versus the software generators. This comparison is based upon 1 multiplied by 10 5 photon histories.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
EditorsJohn Schewel, Peter M. Athanas, V.Michael Jr. Bove, John Watson
Pages295-299
Number of pages5
Volume2914
Publication statusPublished - 1996
EventHigh-Speed Computing, Digital Signal Processing, and Filtering Using Reconfigurable Logic - Boston, MA, USA
Duration: Nov 20 1996Nov 21 1996

Other

OtherHigh-Speed Computing, Digital Signal Processing, and Filtering Using Reconfigurable Logic
CityBoston, MA, USA
Period11/20/9611/21/96

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

DeMarco, J. J., Smathers, J. B., Solberg, T. D., & Casselman, S. (1996). Application of FPGA technology to performance limitations in radiation therapy. In J. Schewel, P. M. Athanas, V. M. J. Bove, & J. Watson (Eds.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 2914, pp. 295-299)