Argonaute and the nuclear RNAs: New pathways for RNA-Mediated control of gene expression

Keith T. Gagnon, David R. Corey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

Small RNAs are a commonly used tool for gene silencing and a promising platform for nucleic acid drug development. They are almost exclusively used to silence gene expression post-transcriptionally through degradation of mRNA. Small RNAs, however, can have a broader range of function by binding to Argonaute proteins and associating with complementary RNA targets in the nucleus, including long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) and pre-mRNA. Argonaute-RNA complexes can regulate nuclear events like transcription, genome maintenance, and splicing. Thousands of lncRNAs and alternatively spliced pre-mRNA isoforms exist in humans, and these RNAs may serve as natural targets for regulation and therapeutic intervention. This review describes nuclear mechanisms for Argonaute proteins and small RNAs, new pathways for sequence-specific targeting, and the potential for therapeutic development of small RNAs with nuclear targets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-16
Number of pages14
JournalNucleic Acid Therapeutics
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2012

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Drug Discovery

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