Assessing the relationship between language proficiency and asthma morbidity among inner-city asthmatics

Juan P. Wisnivesky, Meyer Kattan, David Evans, Howard Leventhal, Tamara J. Musumeci-Szabó, Thomas McGinn, Ethan A. Halm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Patient-provider communication is essential for high-quality asthma care. The objective of this study was to assess the potential relationship of language barriers with outcomes of inner-city asthmatics. Research Design: We interviewed a prospective cohort of 318 adults with persistent asthma receiving care at 2 large inner-city clinics. Patients were classified into 3 groups according to their English proficiency; non-Hispanics (all native English speakers), Hispanics proficient in English, and Hispanics with limited English proficiency. Data on asthma control (Asthma Control Questionnaire), resource utilization, and asthma-related quality of life (Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire) were collected at 1 and 3 months of enrollment. Univariate and multiple regression analyses were used to compare asthma morbidity and quality of life according to the patients' level of English proficiency. Results: Overall, 44% of patients were non-Hispanics, 38% were Hispanics proficient in English, and 18% were Hispanics with limited English proficiency. Unadjusted, stratified, and multivariate analyses showed a significant association between limited proficiency and poorer asthma control, increased resource utilization, and lower quality of life scores after controlling for potential confounders (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). Additionally, limited English proficiency was associated with increased worries about side effects or becoming addicted to inhaled corticosteroids, beliefs that asthma is an acute disease, decreased self-efficacy, and lower adherence rates. Conclusions: Inner-city asthmatics with limited English proficiency have significantly poorer asthma control, higher rates of resource utilization, and a lower quality of life. Further research is necessary to understand the mechanisms underlying this association.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)243-249
Number of pages7
JournalMedical Care
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2009

Fingerprint

Language
Asthma
Morbidity
Quality of Life
Hispanic Americans
Communication Barriers
Quality of Health Care
Acute Disease
Self Efficacy
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Research Design
Multivariate Analysis
Communication
Regression Analysis
Research

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Hispamcs
  • Language
  • Outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Wisnivesky, J. P., Kattan, M., Evans, D., Leventhal, H., Musumeci-Szabó, T. J., McGinn, T., & Halm, E. A. (2009). Assessing the relationship between language proficiency and asthma morbidity among inner-city asthmatics. Medical Care, 47(2), 243-249. https://doi.org/10.1097/MLR.0b013e3181847606

Assessing the relationship between language proficiency and asthma morbidity among inner-city asthmatics. / Wisnivesky, Juan P.; Kattan, Meyer; Evans, David; Leventhal, Howard; Musumeci-Szabó, Tamara J.; McGinn, Thomas; Halm, Ethan A.

In: Medical Care, Vol. 47, No. 2, 02.2009, p. 243-249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wisnivesky, JP, Kattan, M, Evans, D, Leventhal, H, Musumeci-Szabó, TJ, McGinn, T & Halm, EA 2009, 'Assessing the relationship between language proficiency and asthma morbidity among inner-city asthmatics', Medical Care, vol. 47, no. 2, pp. 243-249. https://doi.org/10.1097/MLR.0b013e3181847606
Wisnivesky JP, Kattan M, Evans D, Leventhal H, Musumeci-Szabó TJ, McGinn T et al. Assessing the relationship between language proficiency and asthma morbidity among inner-city asthmatics. Medical Care. 2009 Feb;47(2):243-249. https://doi.org/10.1097/MLR.0b013e3181847606
Wisnivesky, Juan P. ; Kattan, Meyer ; Evans, David ; Leventhal, Howard ; Musumeci-Szabó, Tamara J. ; McGinn, Thomas ; Halm, Ethan A. / Assessing the relationship between language proficiency and asthma morbidity among inner-city asthmatics. In: Medical Care. 2009 ; Vol. 47, No. 2. pp. 243-249.
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