Assessment of laryngopharyngeal sensation in children with dysphagia

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Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis To assess laryngopharyngeal sensation, prevalence of laryngopharyngeal sensory deficit and abnormal swallowing function parameters in children with dysphagia. Study Design Retrospective chart review. Methods The medical records of children who underwent flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing with sensory testing (FEESST) were reviewed. Laryngopharyngeal sensory threshold (LPST) was assessed based on the threshold intensity of air pulse stimulation eliciting laryngeal adductor reflex. Swallowing function parameters including pharyngeal residue, hypopharyngeal pooling of secretions, premature spillage, laryngeal penetration, and aspiration were evaluated. Prevalence of abnormal swallowing function parameters in children with normal and impaired LPST was compared. Results Forty children with dysphagia (28 male, 12 female; age range, 3 months to 17 years) underwent FEESST. LPST was normal in six patients, moderately impaired in 20 patients, and severely impaired in 10 patients. LPST could not be measured in four patients. Children showed one or more abnormal swallowing function parameters. The prevalence of abnormal swallowing parameters in patients with normal LPST was lower than that of patients with moderately or severely impaired LPST (P <.05). The prevalence of pharyngeal residue, hypopharyngeal pooling of secretions, and spillage in patients with severely impaired LPST was higher than that of patients with moderately impaired LPST (P <.05). Conclusions The majority of children with dysphagia have impaired LPST. The prevalence of abnormal swallowing function parameters in children with normal LPST is lower than that in children with moderately or severely impaired LPST. Prevalence of aspiration tends to increase when the abnormal swallowing function parameters are associated with severely impaired LPST.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2291-2295
Number of pages5
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume123
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2013

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Keywords

  • aspiration
  • Dysphagia
  • laryngeal penetration
  • laryngeal sensation
  • pediatric
  • premature spillage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

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