Association between side effects and blood microRNA expression levels and their targeted pathways in patients with major depressive disorder treated by a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, escitalopram: A CAN-BIND-1 Report

Antoine Yrondi, Laura M. Fiori, Benicio N. Frey, Raymond W. Lam, Glenda M. MacQueen, Roumen Milev, Daniel J. Müller, Jane A. Foster, Sidney H. Kennedy, Gustavo Turecki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Antidepressant drugs are effective therapies for major depressive disorder; however, they are frequently associated with side effects. Although there is some evidence for a relationship between genetic variation and side effects, little is known regarding the role of dynamic molecular factors as moderators of side effects. The aim of this study was to assess microRNA (miRNA) changes associated with side effects during escitalopram treatment and their downstream effects on target gene expression. Methods: A total 160 patients with major depressive disorder from the CAN-BIND-1 cohort were included. Side effects were assessed with the Toronto Side Effect Scale after 2 weeks of treatment with escitalopram. We assessed the relationship between side effects and changes in peripheral expression of miRNAs between baseline and week 2. For miRNA whose expression changed, we used target prediction algorithms to identify putative messenger RNA (mRNA) targets and assessed their expression. Significance Statement While there are several studies focusing on genetic variation as predictors of side effects, there is little information on the possible role of dynamic molecular factors as side effect moderators. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are particularly good dynamic molecular factors to investigate for a relationship with antidepressant side effects. This study is the first, to our knowledge, to examine the role of miRNAs in the emergence of side effects during antidepressant treatment. We found negative associations between intensity of nausea and expression of miRNAs. Results: Nausea was experienced by 42.5% of patients. We identified 45 miRNAs whose expression changed on initiation of escitalopram treatment, of which 10 displayed a negative association with intensity of nausea (miR15b-5p, miR17-5p, miR20a-5p, miR20b-5p, miR103a-3p, miR103b, miR106a-5p, miR182-5p, miR185-5p, and miR660-5p). Additionally, we found negative associations between 4 microRNAs (miR20a-5p, miR106a-5p, miR185-5p, miR660-5p) and mRNA targets. The expression of the miR185-5p target, CAMK2δ was significantly decreased [log 2 mean = −0.048 (0.233)] between weeks 0 and 2 (P=.01)]. Conclusions: We identified an overexpression of miR185-5p during escitalopram treatment of major depressive disorder, which was negatively associated with intensity of nausea, and identified a potential mRNA target that may mediate this effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)88-95
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Antidepressant
  • Major depressive disorder
  • MiRNA
  • Side effects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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